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Alabama’s Roy Moore: I blocked gay marriages because father-daughter weddings were next

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Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore said this week that “men and their daughters or women and their sons” would want to get married next if LGBT people were granted equal marriage rights.

On the Sunday before a federal judge ruled that Alabama must begin issuing same-sex marriage licenses, Moore had ordered the state’s probate judges to refuse licenses to gay couples, a move that was compared to Gov. George Wallace blocking desegregation in the 1960s.

Although some same-sex marriages were performed in Alabama on Monday, more than 50 state judges followed Moore’s advice.

“We waited 33 years for this,” Joe Baker told ABC News on Monday. “It’s a big disappointment.”

But Moore argued that gay marriage was a states’ rights issue because the U.S. Constitution had not given the federal government the power legalize it.

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“I think that the definition of the word marriage is not found within the powers designated to the federal government,” he explained to ABC News.

Moore said that he was the only person who could order the state’s probate judges to issue marriage licenses. And since he was not named in the lawsuit, the federal court’s ruling does not apply to him, he said.

And the chief justice was confident that he would “absolutely not” end up on the wrong side of history.

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“Do they stop with one man and one man or one woman and one woman?” he asked. “Or do they go to multiple marriages? Or do they go to marriages between men and their daughters or women and their sons?”

Watch the video below from ABC’s Good Morning America, broadcast Feb. 10, 2015.


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Professor reminds Trump of his two immigrant wives: ‘Four of his five children are children of immigrants’

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As President Donald Trump complains about immigrants, he should remember his own family, Fordham Professor Christina Greer explained on MSNBC on Monday.

"Mind you, he's a child of immigrants and twice married to two immigrants, right? Four of his five children are children of immigrants, but he has to use this rhetoric to make sure that he can frame all of his failures in a way that it’s never him and it’s always someone else who is taking away from the good, 'white Americans' who deserve to be here," Greer explained.

In 1977, Trump became the second husband of Ivana Zelníčková -- who was born in Czechoslovakia. She is the mother of Donald Trump, Jr., Ivanka Trump and Eric Trump.

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Racism drives Trump ‘like rocket fuel’ — but even for him, this is ‘shocking and disgraceful’: WaPo journalist

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On Monday's edition of CNN's "The Situation Room," Washington Post reporter David Swerdlick told anchor Wolf Blitzer that there's nothing truly new about President Donald Trump's racist social media assaults on Democratic congresswomen of color — but that there is something uniquely horrible about the latest episode.

"People are suggesting what the president has said in the past day or two represents a new low," said Blitzer. "But when you look at the president's history ... the president claiming Barack Obama wasn't born here in the United States, his comments about Charlottesville. This clearly isn't a one-off."

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Trump’s racism ‘fundamentally disqualifies him to be president’: Former White House lawyer

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The former acting solicitor general of the United States explained on MSNBC on Monday that President Donald Trump's racism "fundamentally disqualifies him to be president."

Neal Katyal was interviewed by MSNBC chief legal correspondent Ari Melber on "The Beat."

"I think the reason why you get these comments creating such resonance in the country is because of the personal dimension. I think — I don’t talk personally on your show much, but I think anyone who has brown skin hears these comments all the time," Katyal explained. For me it started when I was 3 years old when my mom was pulling out of the car, pulling out of the driveway and someone knocked on her door and said, 'go back to your country.'"

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