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Sandy Hook ‘truthers’ are abusing victims — but one family is fighting back with creative legal maneuver

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Family members of a first-grade teacher killed in the Sandy Hook massacre have applied to trademark her name to prevent conspiracy theorists from misusing it on social media.

Victoria Soto helped students hide and tried to shield others as a gunman killed 20 children and six women during the December 2012 rampage.

Eleven students in Soto’s classroom survived, but the gunman killed the 27-year-old teacher.

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Soto’s sister said Sandy Hook “truthers,” who believe the government staged or faked the shootings to usher in gun control laws, have set up phony social media accounts using the teacher’s name to promote their conspiracy theories, reported The Guardian.

A family friend who helps them manage their social media accounts said she must fill out a form and send it to Twitter each time they discover an unauthorized or abusive account.

Some of those accounts have been used to harass Soto’s relatives, the sister said.

At least one account, which purports to have been online “WAY BEFORE #Sandyhoax,” continues to use Soto’s name to promote conspiracy theories about the school shooting.

Jillian Soto said the phony accounts interfere with fundraising for the Vicki Soto Memorial Fund, which provides scholarships to education students.

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Relatives hope trademark protection will help speed up the process for shutting down unauthorized social media accounts and other abuse.

The Connecticut Attorney General’s office said it has not received any formal complaints from Sandy Hook families about Twitter abuse, although authorities said they reported complaints about Facebook to which the social media company responded.

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Watergate prosecutor breaks down why Trump is now ‘more dangerous than Nixon’ — and an ‘existential threat to democracy’: Watergate prosecutor

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Jill Wine-Banks, now 76, has vivid memories of Richard Nixon’s presidency and the Watergate scandal: the Chicago-born attorney was part of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Watergate prosecution team and reported to Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski. In recent months, Wine-Banks has had much to say about the Ukraine scandal and the impeachment of President Donald Trump — and when she appeared on Lawrence O’Donnell’s show on MSNBC on Monday night, February 24, she explained why she believes that Trump is more dangerous than Nixon.

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Texas man assaulted girlfriend for speaking Spanish: police affidavit

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A Texas man has been arrested for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend for speaking Spanish.

Local news station Fox 7 Austin reports that 46-year-old Rogelio Moreno Lara was charged this week with "continuous violence," a third-degree felony, for his alleged assault against his girlfriend, who told police that he has regularly demanded that she only speak English.

According to Fox 7 Austin, the woman told police that Lara earlier this month "got up from the living room couch and got on top of her on the bed and grabbed her head by her hair with two hands and shook her head while telling her not to speak Spanish anymore." She also said that "he pulled her hair for about 15 seconds and slapped her once."

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‘This is outrageous’: Legal experts condemn Trump for demanding Sotomayor and Ginsburg recusals

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President Donald Trump Monday night called on Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg recuse themselves from any cases involving the president, a demand critics denounced as an "outrageous" attack on the nation's highest legal body.

"Justice Sotomayor issued a reasoned dissent noting a pattern among the justices of allowing the Trump administration to ignore the appellate courts and skip to the SCOTUS to secure their desired outcome."—Kristen Clarke, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Trump's demand came in response to Sotomayor's scathing dissent in the Supreme Court's 5-4 decision to allow the president's so-called "wealth test" for immigrants—also known as the public charge rule—to take effect in Illinois. Sotomayor accused the court's five conservative justices of favoring one litigant over all others—the Trump administration—in their ruling.

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