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‘Bullsh*t’: Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver rips paleo cookbook for kids that claims to prevent autism

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Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver ripped a popular paleo diet cookbook for children as nonsense.

Publication of the cookbook, “Bubba Yum Yum: The Paleo Way,” by Australian chef Pete Evans, was put on hold earlier this month over serious concerns by health experts, who said babies could die from ingesting some of the recipes.

“There’s a lot of bullsh*t around at the moment,” Oliver told the Daily Mail. “I see world experts every two weeks for three hours on different specialisms (but) the reality is, these very specific diets are quite unsustainable.”

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Practitioners of the trendy diet eat as they imagine humans’ ancestors might have during the Paleolithic, or Stone, Age – which occurred about 2.6 million to 10,000 years ago – and avoid dairy, agricultural products, and processed food.

Evans, a celebrity judge on “My Kitchen Rules,” advocates the paleo diet and published a book aimed at children co-written with food blogger Charlotte Carr and naturopath Helen Padarin.

Evans claims the paleo diet may help prevent autism, birth defects, behavioral disorders, digestive problems, rashes, and asthma.

Health experts raised alarms that the book’s recipe for baby bone broth formula, which also includes oils and a probiotic supplement, could trigger a vitamin A overdose in infants.

An overdose of the vitamin could cause loss of appetite, dry hair, skin loss, bone pain, mouth fissures, and other ill health effects.

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According to the World Health Organization, the only safe alternative to breast milk is commercial formula — but co-author Carr said she made her own baby formula for her own son on the recommendation of a naturopath over concerns about ingredients.

Experts said adults can follow the paleo diet with few ill health effects, but they said it’s inappropriate for young children.

“That’s the really troubling thing: the infant is totally at the whim of their parents when it comes to feeding,” said Heather Yeatman, president of the Public Health Association of Australia. “If the wrong decision is made, they may be seriously affected.”

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Carr, the food blogger and “Bubba Yum Yum” co-author, also attracted negative attention recently after it was revealed that she did voice-over work in commercials for Coca Cola, KFC, and Cadbury.


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A historian details Trump’s surprising and peculiar relationship with America’s Puritan legacy

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WHCA statement on today’s press conference—at which Trump took no questions—where seats were initially placed far apart but were moved closer together before the event started. The press office told WHCA that decision was made because "it looks better.” pic.twitter.com/KEXbHxfLh5

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Trump supporters desperately grasp at a new ‘gotcha’ to discredit a national social justice uprising

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