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Bill O’Reilly tries to shame Baltimore single mom caught on video pulling son from riot

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Fox News host Bill O'Reilly on April 29, 2015. [YouTube]

Fox News host Bill O’Reilly insisted on Wednesday that the Baltimore woman who has gained attention for disciplining her son amid a riot in the city on Monday was not giving her children a chance to succeed in life.

“I was fascinated by that,” O’Reilly said of Toya Graham. “But I was also fascinated by the fact that this African-American woman — who obviously loves and cares about her son — has six children by a number of different men. How does she think that these six children are gonna compete in that kind of a structure.”

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O’Reilly was immediately challenged by contributor and former Georgia state legislator Alveda King, the niece of Martin Luther King Jr.

“Bill, I have six children — one by one father and five by another father,” King said. “I raised them as a single mother. I had a similar encounter with my youngest son; I said, ‘Are you trying to be a thug?’ I said, ‘You’re not a thug.'”

“But you’re an educated woman,” O’Reilly responded. “She’s not an educated woman.”

“I was an educated woman,” King said. “But that lady spoke very well.”

Graham garnered media attention after she was filmed slapping her 16-year-old son, Michael Singleton, and pushing him away from the scene during the early stages of what became a riot in the city on Monday night. Graham later told CBS News she was “shocked” to see Singleton wearing a mask as people threw rocks at police.

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“That’s my only son, and at the end of the day, I don’t want him to be a Freddie Gray,” she said on Tuesday. “But to stand up there and vandalize police officers, that’s not justice. I’m a single mom, and I have six children, and I just choose not to live like that no more, and I don’t want that for him.”

On Wednesday, O’Reilly cited a 2010 study arguing that 72 percent of black Americans were born out of wedlock. That statistic was given more context by journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates in The Atlantic in 2013. Coates pointed out that, while there were more unmarried women in the black community at the time, the actual birthrate among both married and unmarried black women was on the decline.

“Indeed, whereas at one point married black women were having more kids than married white women, they are now having less,” he wrote. “I point this out to show that the idea that the idea that, somehow, the black community has fallen into a morass of cultural pathology is convenient nostalgia. There is nothing ‘immoral’ or ‘pathological’ about deciding not to marry.”

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Similarly, civil rights activist Connie Rice refuted O’Reilly’s notion that children raised under single mothers represented a “disintegration” of traditional families.

“The factors that you’re citing are marginal,” said Rice, co-founder of The Advancement Project. “The biggest factors are mass incarceration, the impact of technology on the labor force, the lack of jobs, and the absolute focus — zero focus — on eliminating poverty.”

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O’Reilly interrupted, saying, “In any ghetto, in any world, if you get an education, you’ll get a job.”

Watch the discussion, as posted online on Wednesday, below.

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2020 Election

Trump says militia that sought to kidnap and kill Michigan’s Gov. Whitmer was ‘maybe a problem, maybe it wasn’t’

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In a startling moment during his Michigan rally Tuesday, President Donald Trump implied that the militia that attempted to kidnap and kill Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D-MI) was maybe or maybe not all that big of a problem.

“People are entitled to say maybe it was a problem, maybe it wasn’t," Trump told his rally.

It's a commonly used tactic by Trump to say things like "people say" or "some say" or raise hypotheticals so that it gives him the ability to say "I don't think that, people do." But he has never been able to cite the actual person that said that to him.

In this case, one would assume all political leaders would oppose kidnapping and killing a political leader regardless of the party to which he or she belongs. In Ohio they've opted for a gentler approach, merely trying to recall Republican Gov. Mike DeWine for his mask mandate.

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2020 Election

Trump’s closing argument to women: ‘We’re getting your husbands back to work’

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One week before the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump made his closing argument to women at a campaign rally in Lansing, Michigan.

"I love women and I can't help it, they're the greatest," Trump said, four years after the Access Hollywood tape was released which showed him bragging about sexually assaulting strangers.

"I love them much more than the men," he added.

Trump also made an economic argument that sounded as dated as his talk about "suburban housewives."

"We're getting your husbands -- they want to get back to work, right? We're getting your husbands back to work," he argued.

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2020 Election

Trump chants ‘COVID!’ ten times in a row after Obama slams him as ‘jealous’ of virus

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President Donald Trump on Tuesday again complained about the amount of media coverage being given to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Trump made the remarks at a campaign event in Lansing, Michigan, where he reminded supporters that he had been infected by the virus.

"I would like to give me full credit," the president said of his recovery. "I don't want to give the drug any credit. I want to say, because I am a very young person that's in perfect physical shape, I took that virus and I woke up the next morning and I felt like Superman."

Trump then motioned to members of the media at the event.

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