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Turkish President Erdogan blasts New York Times for editorial criticizing him: ‘Know your place’

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President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday accused the New York Times of meddling in Turkey’s affairs with a critical editorial, angrily telling the US daily to “know your place.”

In a growing controversy over media rights in Turkey ahead of June 7 legislative polls, Erdogan blasted an “impolite” editorial in the New York Times last week which he said “literally gave orders to the United States.”

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“As a newspaper, you (the New York Times) should know your place,” he said in a televised speech in Istanbul.

“You are meddling in Turkey’s affairs by writing something like this. By publishing this editorial, you are overstepping the limits of freedom,” he said.

The New York Times had on Friday published a editorial entitled “Dark Clouds Over Turkey” that was deeply critical of Erdogan’s rule, and accusing him of a crackdown ahead of the polls.

“The United States and Turkey’s other NATO allies should be urging (Erdogan) to turn away from this destructive path,” the New York Times editorial said.

Erdogan spat back “Who are you? Could you say something like this to the US administration?”

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The editorial referred to attacks by Erdogan on the Dogan Media Group, which owns the Hurriyet daily, over its coverage of the death sentence handed to former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi.

In a bizarre dispute, Erdogan and the government accused Hurriyet of implying he could face the death penalty with its headline “death sentence with 52 percent.”

Erdogan was elected president with 52 percent of the vote in August 2014 elections after more than a decade as prime minister. Morsi had won elections in 2012 with a similar score.

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– ‘Trying to stigmatise us’ –

In a rare statement, the honorary president of Dogan Media Group, Aydin Dogan, 79, said Monday that some politicians “try to stigmatise us as an adversary without even giving the slightest justification.”

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“We can only continue our existence in a free environment under the guarantee of the law,” he said, vowing to keep an “equal stance” from all parties.

“We are neither defying the president and the (ruling) Justice and Development Party (AKP) nor opposing. We are only journalists,” said Dogan, founder of the Dogan Holding conglomerate.

Concerns have mounted in recent months over media rights in Turkey, with legal proceedings opened against several journalists on accusations of insulting Erdogan.

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Political tensions are riding high in Turkey ahead of the June 7 elections, with the AKP battling to keep the dominance it has maintained over the country since it first came to power in 2002.

Erdogan is playing an increasingly active role in the campaign to bolster the AKP, even though as president he should in theory be apolitical.

An opinion poll by the SONAR organisation quoted by Turkish media on Monday said that the AKP was on course to win 41 percent of the vote, but may need to form a coalition for the first time during its almost 13-year domination of the country.

Erdogan wants the AKP to win a two-thirds parliamentary majority, which would allow it to change the constitution and create the presidential system that he yearns for.

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Attacking the Dogan Media Group again in his speech, Erdogan said: “The new constitution and the presidential system will block the way of these coup makers forever.”


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Mississippi Republican who lost to Democrat by 14 votes files request for state House to void the election and declare her the winner

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On Thursday, Mississippi Today reported that state Rep. Ashley Henley, who lost her bid for re-election to Democrat Hester Jackson-McCray by just 14 votes in November, has filed a request for the GOP-controlled state legislature to overturn the results of the election and seat Henley for another term.

Henley cites what she claims are several irregularities in voter signature collection, and "missing" ballots. "There were irregularities that happened, absolutely, documented, very much so that bring into question the legitimacy of the election results," said Henley said. "That is without question."

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Trump’s campaign manager mocked for proudly sharing poll that suggests Dems will keep the House in 2020

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On Thursday, President Donald Trump's campaign manager Brad Parscale posted a poll that was meant to warn Democrats off of their impeachment efforts, by showing how it was hurting their prospects in a competitive House race.

Specifically, the "confidential" poll showed freshman Rep. Kendra Horn (R-OK) down seven points against a generic Republican, and impeachment opposed 52 percent to 45 percent:

Nancy Pelosi is marching members of her caucus off the plank and into the abyss.

Impeachment is killing her freshman members and polling proves it.

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Two House Democrats push a clever plan that calls Republicans’ bluff on their Biden attacks

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Democratic Reps. Katie Porter of California and Max Rose of New York introduced a clever plan this week that will expose whether Republicans’ criticisms of former Vice President Joe Biden in the Ukraine scandal reflect good faith — or if, as many assume, they are just a shameful distraction and a bluff.

The lawmakers announced a bill on Wednesday called the Transparency in Executive Branch Officials’ Finances Act. It has two key components:

First, it would require all politically appointed executive branch officials, as well as the president and the vice president, to “disclose any positions they or any members of their extended families hold with foreign-owned businesses, any intellectual property they own that is protected or enforced by a foreign country, and whether any members of their families have stakes in companies that engage in significant foreign business dealings.”Second, it will “require the President and Vice President to disclose their tax returns for the previous five taxable years and prohibit political appointees from accepting payments from foreign entities.”

What’s clever about the proposal is that it latches on to two important issues, creating a wedge for Republicans. As part of the GOP’s defense of President Donald Trump in the Ukraine scandal, Republicans have argued that the president’s patently corrupt efforts to get a foreign country to investigate Biden, a political rival, were legitimate because the former vice president’s son created a conflict of interest by taking part in business in Ukraine.

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