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Widespread Panic fan dead after Mississippi cops hogtie him and place him face-down on stretcher

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A Mississippi man died Saturday evening after police hogtied him and placed him face-down after he became unruly on his way home from a concert.

Troy Goode, a 30-year-old chemical engineer, was intoxicated after a Widespread Panic concert and rode home with his wife, said an attorney for the man’s family.

He started acting rowdy during the ride, jumped out of the car and ran around outside a shopping center about 7:45 p.m.

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Police were called, and Goode’s wife said the officers aggressively confronted him.

A witness said Goode opened the door to a K-9 patrol car, letting the dog out.

The officers subdued Goode, who was asthmatic, and hogtied him and placed him face-down on a stretcher, the attorney said.

The attorney said witnesses heard Goode, the father of a 15-month-old child, screaming that he could not breathe.

Goode’s wife believed police were taking him to jail, but instead they took him to an area hospital — where he died about three hours later.

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“They came and found him, and what happened after that, how he ended up at Baptist (Memorial) Hospital, I don’t know,” said attorney Tim Edwards. “I do know that Baptist reported to Troy’s mother that he was stable, and less than two hours later they called and said he’d expired.”

Police have not released any other details about Goode’s death or hospitalization, and his body has been taken to Jackson for an autopsy.

The attorney said he believes a bystander recorded video of the incident, and he asked witnesses to come forward to help explain what happened.

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“The family as you might expect is grieving, and they are not irrational at all, but they want answers — they want to know why Troy died,” Edwards said.

Watch this video report posted online by WREG-TV:

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Only 5,500 rapid COVID-19 tests touted by Trump are being deployed — for the entire country: report

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by Rachana Pradham

A coronavirus test made by Abbott Laboratories and introduced with considerable fanfare by President Donald Trump in a Rose Garden news conference this week is giving state and local health officials very little added capacity to perform speedy tests needed to control the COVID-19 pandemic.

“That’s a whole new ballgame,” Trump said. “I want to thank Abbott Labs for the incredible work they’ve done. They’ve been working around-the-clock.”

Yet a document circulated among officials at the Department of Health and Human Services and the Federal Emergency Management Agency this week shows that state and local public health labs were set to receive a total of only 5,500 coronavirus tests from the giant manufacturer of medical devices, diagnostics and drugs, according to emails obtained by Kaiser Health News.

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Maddow reports Florida governor is letting ‘coronavirus-denialist megachurch guy’ hold huge services

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On Sunday, the River Church in Tampa was packed with parishioners despite the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic.

The following day, Hillsborough County Sheriff Chad Chronister arrested Pastor Rodney Howard-Browne for violating the county's social distancing rules.

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Here’s how Christian Nationalists have shaped the federal government’s response to coronavirus

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On Thursday, appearing on the Slate radio show "The Gist" with Mike Pesca, journalist Catherine Stewart outlined some of the ways the Christian Right is responsible for the federal government's disastrous response to coronavirus.

"The coronavirus pandemic is real wrath-of-God type stuff, isn't it?" said Pesca. "Well, there are some people who are waiting for this, who are ready for this, and who, quite scarily, have been tasked with the response."

"It's a complex question, and I think that Christian Nationalism, which is what we're dealing with here, is not a religion," said Stewart. "Many evangelicals are doing very positive things, many religious people are doing a lot of positive things in this situation with the coronavirus. But Christian Nationalism is not a religion, it's a political ideology that cloaks itself in religious rhetoric. And it's a movement that put Trump in power."

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