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Extremists target Mississippi and Idaho residents with ‘white genocide’ robocalls

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[Editor’s note: A previous version of this story identified AFP as a “neo-Nazi” organization. Raw Story received a letter from AFP’s legal team objecting to being labeled with that term. We have since changed the story to label them as “extremists.”]

White supremacists are promoting their racist “mantra” and their presidential candidate through “robocalls” to residents of Idaho and Mississippi.

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The calls promote messages that have circulated for years on the far-right fringes and, in some cases, originated with extremist presidential candidate Bob Whitaker.

“We have to robocall you at home because we all know that the media will not carry our message: Asia for the Asians, Africa for the Africans, white countries for everybody,” a young-sounding woman says in the recorded call.

Columnist Lena Mitchell, of the (Tupelo) Daily Journal, reported that she received one of the recorded calls earlier this month.

“Everybody says there is this race problem,” the caller continues. “Everybody says that this race problem will be solved when the Third World pours into every white country, and only into white countries. Everybody says the final solution to this race problem is for every white country – and only white countries – to assimilate, i.e., intermarry with all those nonwhites.”

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“They say they are anti-racist,” the caller warns, using slogans promoted by Whitaker. “What they really are is anti-white. What they want is white genocide. Genocide is a crime.”

The calls end with a promotion for Whitaker’s long-shot campaign and a request for financial or volunteer support.

Whitaker, who claims to be appointee in the Reagan administration, lives in Columbia, South Carolina — the same town as the white supremacist who gunned down nine black worshipers in Charleston.

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He’s the organizer of Bob’s Underground Graduate Seminar, or BUGS – which has attracted young followers who share his racist slogans on social media and roadside billboards across the country in the belief that their messages will win broad appeal through repetition.

There’s no evidence at this point that Whitaker and the gunman were connected, but the two white supremacists share an admiration for the apartheid governments of South Africa and Rhodesia – now Zimbabwe.

Whitaker, who described the South Carolina church massacre as a response to ongoing racial genocide against white people, is the presidential candidate of the American Freedom Party.

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The party, which was founded in the late ’00s by anti-immigrant skinheads in southern California, originally nominated white supremacist blogger Kenn Gividen for president, but he dropped out in July to spend more time on his racist website.


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‘He knows I’m actually better at the internet’: Andrew Yang says Trump is too scared to attack him

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Presidential candidate Andrew Yang suggested President Donald Trump is too scared to attack him during a CNN appearance on Saturday.

Yang, whose campaign has been buoyed by his passionate online supporters known as the "Yang Gang," was interviewed by Van Jones.

"Part of the thing is that you’re such an unlikely candidate that people, they’re not shooting at you, even Donald Trump doesn’t have a bad name for you yet," Jones noted. "Is that a good thing or a bad thing?"

"Well, Donald Trump hasn’t messed with me online because he knows I’m actually better at the internet than he is," Yang replied, to cheers from the crowd.

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2020 Election

NYT wonders if Republicans challenging Trump are the ‘Three Musketeers’ or the ‘Three Stooges’

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President Donald Trump's three Republican challengers for the GOP's 2020 nomination were featured in a new 1,500-word profile by The New York Times that was published online on Saturday.

Former Gov. Mark Sanford (R-SC), former Rep. Joe Walsh (R-IL) and former Gov. Bill Weld (R-MA) are all challenging the incumbent.

"Supporters of Mr. Trump’s Republican challengers refer to them as the 'Three Musketeers,' and argue that having a trio of challengers — however long their long-shot bids are — could add up to enough of a nuisance to whittle away support for a vulnerable incumbent," the newspaper reported. "The president, on Twitter, has given them a more demeaning nickname: 'the Three Stooges.'"

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NYT columnist has identified the one man who could be an even worse president than Donald Trump

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President Donald Trump has not even been in office for three full years, yet already historians are ranking him as one of the worst American leaders of all time.

But could America do even worse?

Farhad Manjoo, a columnist for The New York Times, conducted a "thought experiment" to imagine how voters could do even worse.

"What sort of character do we have to imagine occupying the White House in 2029 to make lefties like myself feel even a slight pang of nostalgia for the good old days of Donald J. Trump?" he wondered.

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