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This private prison company is getting rich locking up little kids

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An explosive new report from the Daily Beast’s Betsy Woodruff looks at how the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), one of America’s two large private prison corporations, has seen its profits explode, thanks to a little-noticed move by the Obama administration.

Woodruff notes that before last summer, there was virtually no “family detention,” referring to the detention of migrant families crossing the border, children included, in U.S. immigrant detention facilities. But as Human Rights Watch’s Antonio Ginatta noted, “now we’re in the thousands.”

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It started last summer, when large numbers of families fleeing violence in Central America started crossing over into the United States. The Obama administration opened a facility in Artesia, New Mexico, to detain these families; after controversy, that facility was closed and a new one operated by CCA opened in Dilley, Texas, with a capacity of 2,400 beds.

Woodruff notes that CCA’s quarterly report shows its profits in the second quarter of 2015 were $49 million higher than the same period in 2014, largely due to the expansion in detaining migrant families. The Dilley facility alone generated $36 million in revenue during the quarter.

“In just one year, these investment companies have profited millions off of the illegal detention of children and babies fleeing unthinkable harm in Central America,” Bryan Johnson, an immigration attorney representing many of the immigrants at Dilley, told the Daily Beast. “Because these companies wanted a bigger quarterly dividend, dozens of children, including some of my clients, were denied medical treatment to such a shocking degree that their lives were put at imminent risk of death or serious bodily harm.”

“The only reason I can see that people are still in family detention is because there must be incredible pressures to keep it going on the basis of its profitability,” Laura Lichtenberg, an immigration attorney, told Daily Beast.


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In the rush to innovate for COVID-19 drugs, sound science is still essential

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Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have been at the center of debate in recent weeks over which drugs should be used to treat COVID-19. Neither product has strong evidence to support use for this purpose, and small studies reported to date have either had significant flaws or failed to demonstrate effect.

Nonetheless, the president can’t seem to stop pushing them, arguing that patients have nothing to lose. As physicians, bioethicists and drug law experts, we have a responsibility to inject caution here. As public officials and scientists rush to innovate, no one should overlook the critical role of strong regulatory protections in supporting our ability to actually figure out which drugs work against COVID-19. Weakening commitment to science and evidence during this crisis truly would be “a cure worse” than the disease.

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Increasingly detached Trump frequently fantasizes about proving critics wrong about unproven coronavirus treatment: report

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President Donald Trump is leaning on the comfort of Fox News pals, Rudy Giuliani and his family as the coronavirus overwhelms his presidency and keeps him from the campaign trail.

The president has grown even more detached and distrustful of the government he oversees and the medical experts trying to guide him through the pandemic, and he's betting heavily on the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine as a miracle cure for the virus, reported The Daily Beast.

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America is drinking its way through the coronavirus crisis – that means more health woes ahead

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In the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic, it has become easier to buy alcohol than toilet paper or eggs.

Across the U.S., governors are terming alcohol sales an essential business and loosening restrictions to permit home delivery and carryout cocktails, throwing an economic lifeline to one group of small businesses.

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