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Fox guest: Obama used Umpqua College shooting speech to escape ‘avalanche of bad news’

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Conservative columnist Stephen Hayes argued on Thursday that President Barack Obama’s remarks regarding the mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon were his attempt to avoid other issues.

“There were 50 shootings in Chicago over the weekend, for the second straight weekend in a row,” Hayes told Fox News host Bret Baier. “Why didn’t the president go out and make a statement then? I’m sorry. It’s a very cynical thing to say. But you know, he has had an avalanche of bad news over the past 36 hours. And I think he is using this shooting to get out from under it.”

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As Reuters reported, Obama quickly responded to the shooting, which left 10 people dead and seven other wounded, by saying the country’s “thoughts and prayers are not enough” in the wake of another massacre.

“This is something we should politicize,” the president said at one point, which Hayes noted in an exchange with his Washington Post counterpart Charles Lane.

“To say that the president should speak out first on what’s happening on the al-Nusra Front and so forth, as opposed to this,” Lane said, alluding to Syrian fighters allied with al-Qaeda. “I do not think he spoke out today to distract attention.”

“He’s the one who said we should politicize this,” Hayes responded. “Well, he did. I think that’s what he did here. I think he’s distracting attention from his other problems.”

While the panel agreed that the president was “passionate” regarding gun safety, Fox contributor Charles Krauthammer criticized Obama for making his remarks while “the bodies are still warm and the wounded are now in surgery.”

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“It would be nice if he showed equal passion about the complete collapse of six-and-a-half years of policy in the Middle East and the abandonment and bombing of our allies on the ground,” Krauthammer said.

Watch the discussion, as posted by Media Matters on Thursday, below.

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Matt Gaetz insists he wasn’t paying ‘much attention’ as he got burned during hearing – but video shows otherwise

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) lied when he was speaking to CNN's Manu Raju that he wasn't paying much attention when Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) explained that members with DUIs probably shouldn't be attacking someone for drug usage.

“I didn’t pay much attention to it ...I’m focused on the president .. I don’t think Americans are hanging on a traffic incident I had a decade ago,” Gaetz told Raju.

https://twitter.com/mkraju/status/1205208299236450305

It wasn't factually accurate as videos show Gaetz paying quite a bit of attention and seemingly upset.

You can see the exchange in the video below:

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‘It’s all distractions’: CNN panel obliterates GOP for totally refusing to discuss Trump’s conduct

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A CNN panel on Thursday obliterated House Republicans for once again completely ignoring the substance of allegations against President Donald Trump and instead throwing out numerous distractions intended to deflect attention from the president's actions.

"It's been distractions about the Bidens, it's been distractions about conspiracy theories about Ukraine's involvement in the election," said CNN legal analyst Carrie Cordero. "Yesterday, it was distractions about FISA and FISA so-called abuse. It was distractions from Congressman Gohmert reading calls from 1943! It's been all distractions and they won't wrestle with the actual conduct."

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CNN’s Jake Tapper does line-by-line fact check of Jim Jordan’s nonstop misleading statements during impeachment hearing

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Host Jake Tapper did a special web fact-check for CNN.com where he looked line-by-line into Rep. Jim Jordan's (R-OH) claims about the impeachment proceedings.

He had four specific talking points that were disingenuous and outright false.

1. Jordan: "There was no quid pro quo in the transcript"

There absolutely was evidence in the summary of the transcript. Tapper began by explaining that Americans still haven't seen the full transcript or a recording of the July 25 phone call between President Donald Trump and Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky.

"If you read the summary of the transcript it clearly shows that after a discussion of U.S. military support for Ukraine, President Trump said the relationship is not 'reciprocal' and he asks Zelensky for 'a favor,'" Tapper said. "The favor? To investigate a conspiracy theory into the 2016 election and later in the call he says, 'one other thing,' he wants Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter."

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