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Here are the 5 best ‘Berns’ of the GOP presidential field — so far

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Bernie Sanders doesn’t do negative campaigning. In his decades of public service, he has never run an attack ad.

He does, however, believe in challenging the views of his opponents. Throughout the course of the campaign, he has distinguished his own worldview from that of Republican presidential hopefuls. Here are some of his best “berns” of GOP frontrunner Donald Trump and other GOP candidates.

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1. Condemning Trump’s Bigotry

Trump has made bigoted statements on numerous occasions to bolster his presidential run, and by August, Sanders had had enough.

“I think Donald Trump’s views on immigration and his slurring of the Latino community is not something that should be going on in the year 2015,” he said. “And it’s to me an embarrassment for our country.”

2. Defending America’s Religious Pluralism from Ben Carson

When Dr. Ben Carson said a Muslim should not be president, Sanders condemned him.

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“This is the year 2015. For a long, long time in the history of America, there were people who would say, ‘You know, we don’t want a Catholic to be president of the United States.’ And then John F. Kennedy became president in 1960,” Sanders said. “And then people said, ‘Oh, we don’t want a black guy, [an] African American, to be president of the United States,’ and then finally Barack Obama became president of the United States. Look, you judge candidates for president not on their religion, not on the color of their skin, but on their ideas on what they stand for. That’s what democracy is supposed to be about. So I was very disappointed in Dr. Carson’s statement, and I disagree with him.”

3. Calling Out Jeb Bush’s Insults Toward African Americans

Jeb Bush said that he didn’t want to offer “free stuff” to African American voters. Sanders hit back on Twitter that this was “pathetic. @JebBush wants more tax breaks for his billionaire friends while cutting help for working people.”

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4. Summarizing GOP Hate

Shortly after Bush’s comments, Sanders summarized how his opponents seem to be avoiding the issues and just engaging in divisive hate by tweeting: “Can’t @JebBush and the GOP run a campaign without attacking African Americans, Latinos, Muslims or other people?”

5. Going to Town on the GOP Debates

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During the two GOP debates that have taken place so far, Bernie Sanders decided to live-tweet his own reactions to their remarks. Many of his responses had to do with how disconnected the debates were from the concerns of ordinary Americans: “Waiting, waiting, waiting. Will we hear anything about racial justice, income inequality or making college affordable?” Others had to do with poking fun at  frontrunner Donald Trump’s lack of humility: “Trump. What a pleasant and humble person. Can’t stop saying kind and generous things about his fellow Republicans.” And there was also his derision of their foreign policy views: “War, war, war. When do we get to their other major priority: tax breaks for billionaires?” His final tweet of the second debate, sent half an hour before it ended, had a bite: “Thank you all. I’ve had it. I’m going home. Talk to you soon.”

Sanders is known for running positive campaigns. But as his performance so far has shown, that doesn’t mean he isn’t willing to show Americans what’s wrong with the worldview and actions of his opponents, and he has delivered some of the election season’s most memorable Berns.


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Here’s how Christian Nationalists have shaped the federal government’s response to coronavirus

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On Thursday, appearing on the Slate radio show "The Gist" with Mike Pesca, journalist Catherine Stewart outlined some of the ways the Christian Right is responsible for the federal government's disastrous response to coronavirus.

"The coronavirus pandemic is real wrath-of-God type stuff, isn't it?" said Pesca. "Well, there are some people who are waiting for this, who are ready for this, and who, quite scarily, have been tasked with the response."

"It's a complex question, and I think that Christian Nationalism, which is what we're dealing with here, is not a religion," said Stewart. "Many evangelicals are doing very positive things, many religious people are doing a lot of positive things in this situation with the coronavirus. But Christian Nationalism is not a religion, it's a political ideology that cloaks itself in religious rhetoric. And it's a movement that put Trump in power."

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Jared Kushner ripped by NYT columnist: He will ‘get us all killed’ with his incompetence

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On Thursday, writing for The New York Times, columnist Michelle Goldberg laid into President Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner, who appeared at the day's coronavirus press conference to blame states for the federal government's slow response.

"Reporting on the White House’s herky-jerky coronavirus response, Vanity Fair’s Gabriel Sherman has a quotation from Jared Kushner that should make all Americans, and particularly all New Yorkers, dizzy with terror," wrote Goldberg. "According to Sherman, when New York’s governor, Andrew Cuomo, said that the state would need 30,000 ventilators at the apex of the coronavirus outbreak, Kushner decided that Cuomo was being alarmist. 'I have all this data about I.C.U. capacity,' Kushner reportedly said. 'I'm doing my own projections, and I've gotten a lot smarter about this. New York doesn’t need all the ventilators.'"

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Trump expected to tell all Americans to wear cloth masks in public: report

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The Trump White House is expected to urge Americans to wear cloth face masks when in public to help slow the transmission of coronavirus, in a reversal of current guidelines. The CDC says there is increasing evidence asymptomatic coronavirus carriers may be spreading the virus more than first believed, The Washington Post reports.

But studies going back weeks or longer made clear people who show few or no symptoms are "shedding" more of the virus – spreading it – at a rate higher than some who are fully symptomatic.

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