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Doctors must send ultrasound pics to North Carolina officials under ‘creepy’ new anti-abortion law

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Doctors must send ultrasound images of women seeking abortions to state officials under a newly enacted law in North Carolina.

Anti-abortion activists say the law is intended to verify that doctors and health clinics are complying with state law, which prohibits abortions after 20 weeks with some exceptions for medical emergencies, reported the New York Times.

The law requires health care providers who perform abortions after the 16-week mark to send ultrasound images to North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services so officials can verify the “probable gestational age” of the fetus.

But critics say the law, which went into effect Jan. 1, serves no medical purpose and is instead intended “to shame women and intimidate the doctors that care for them.”

The law’s stated purpose is to gather ultrasound data for “statistical purposes only,” and proponents insist patients’ and doctors’ names will be kept confidential.

But pro-choice critics, such as Gerrick Brenner of the liberal group Progress NC Action, described the law as a “creepy scheme” that reminds them of “something out of George Orwell’s ‘1984.’”

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Anti-abortion activist Tami Fitzgerald helped push the measure, which she said was necessary to prevent doctors from lying about gestational age to skirt existing abortion limits.

She has not offered any examples of physicians engaging in those actions the law is intended to prevent.

The law also extends the waiting period for abortions to 72 hours — the nation’s longest.

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders is so toxic few people would admit to attending her going away party

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Outgoing White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders redefined the role of her position by refusing to hold daily briefings and brazenly lying to protect President Donald Trump.

She was even cited in the Mueller report for admitting under oath that she had lied from the podium.

So when Politico's Anita Kumar and the Daily Mail's Francesca Chambers decided to throw Sanders a going away party, there was immediate outrage.

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Soccer superstar Megan Rapinoe profanely rips Trump and vows she won’t go to the White House

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U.S. women's national soccer team star Megan Rapinoe will not be visiting the White House if the team successfully repeats their Women's World Cup victory.

"I'm not going to the f*cking White House," she told Eight By Eight Magazine.

"We're not going to be invited," she added.

On Monday, President Donald Trump ripped Rapinoe for protested during the national anthem.

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Robert Mueller likely thought Don Jr. was guilty — here’s why that actually made it hard to investigate Trump

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Special counsel Robert Mueller has completed his investigation of ties between Russia and President Donald Trump's campaign, turned over his findings to Congress, and stepped down from his post at the Justice Department.

His findings were incredibly damning for the president and his allies, finding evidence that the campaign eagerly accepted Russian help, if not a full-blown conspiracy, and outlining ten potential episodes where Trump obstructed justice. But Mueller's conclusions are by no means the end-all of everything that happened. Mueller himself acknowledged in his report that Trump's lack of cooperation probably prevented him from finding a lot of information.

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