Quantcast
Connect with us

WATCH: Stephen Colbert’s fascinating interview with pyramid-discovering ‘space archaeologist’ Sarah Parcak

Published

on

Talking a break from celebrity chit-chat, Late Show host Stephen Colbert welcomed ‘space archaeologist’ Sarah Parcak to his show to discuss how she uses high-resolution photography of Earth taken from space to search for lost pyramids and towns buried beneath Earth’s surface.

Parcak, an associate professor of Anthropology and director of the Laboratory for Global Observation at the University of Alabama, recently was awarded the 2016 $1 million TED Prize for her talk on how she uses satellite imagery to discover below-surface ruins.

ADVERTISEMENT

Her TED talk can be seen below.

Describing her work as if “Indiana Jones had a lovechild With Google Earth,” Parcak described finding the sites of 17 potential pyramids in Egypt, 3,100 missing settlements, and over a thousand lost tombs.

Indicating a photo she said shows an ancient amphitheater in Rome, Parcak explained, “Processing the satellite data and looking for subtle differences in vegetation health, which you literally cannot see visibly, we’re able to map this, about 120 feet across.”

According to Parcak, by looking at for subtle differences in the light spectrum surrounding plants, she can tell if there are anomalies below the surface that may indicate ruins. This allows archaeologists to pinpoint exactly where to look.

Colbert grew uncontrollably excited when she shared imagery of what lies beneath the city of Tanis, where film’s Indiana Jones discovered the clues to the Ark of the Covenant within the secret chamber known as the Well of the Souls.

Watch the video below from YouTube:

ADVERTISEMENT

Parcak’s TED talk below:


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘It’s a disgrace’: Conservative torches Trump and the GOP — saying they’ve betrayed voters

Published

on

In 2012, Stuart Stevens served as the chief strategist for Republican Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign and tried to prevent President Barack Obama from winning a second term; in 2020, he is a Never Trump conservative who is rooting for former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee. And when Stevens appeared on MSNBC’s “The 11th Hour” on Thursday night, August 6, he stressed to host Brian Williams that many GOP incumbents — from President Donald Trump to members of Congress — could be in trouble in November.

Promoting his new book, “It Was All a Lie: How the Republican Party Became Donald Trump,” Stevens told Williams, “This is a very negative environment for Republicans…. There are external forces out there that make this a very tough race for incumbents in the Republican Party.”

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump aides frustrated by his ‘nonsensical’ Biden attacks in Ohio: AP reporter

Published

on

During a segment on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Associated Press White House correspondent Jonathan Lemire stated that aides close to President Donald Trump thought the president made some good points about the U.S. economy on Thursday -- only to have his message overlooked when he attacked former Vice President Joe Biden.

Speaking with co-host Willie Geist, Lemire said there were other problems with the Ohio visit -- including Republican Gov. Mike DeWine being unable to attend because he tested positive for COVID-19 -- but Trump stating Biden "hurts God" made the economic points the president made secondary in a state where he needs votes.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Expert: Trump playing ‘whack-a-mole’ in attempt to salvage states he should be winning

Published

on

A top political analyst says President Donald Trump seems to be flying blind as he heads toward an electoral loss.

Dave Wasserman, the U.S. House editor for the Cook Report, told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that demographic changes had turned formerly reliable red states into competitive congressional races, and that same dynamic had made Trump's re-election campaign even more challenging.

"Pennsylvania, Florida and North Carolina, if you talk to the Trump data people they'll hang their hat on the gap getting narrower in those states," Wasserman said. "What's happening is that a lot of the older voters who, for lack of a better term, are exiting the electorate. They are disproportionally registered Democrats who are conservative and voted for Trump in 2016. Yes, the registration gap is narrowing, fewer voters are registering to vote this year than did in 2016 because we're in a pandemic. That doesn't mean the states are getting more favorable to Trump."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image