Quantcast
Connect with us

Idaho Republican thinks ‘trauma’ prevents pregnancy in rape: ‘That may be true with incest a little bit’

Published

on

Another Republican lawmaker suggested women and girls are unlikely to become pregnant from rape or incest.

Idaho state Rep. Pete Nielson (R-Mountain Home) spoke up during a hearing Thursday during a legislative hearing to decide whether abortion providers should be required to give patients a list of facilities that offer free ultrasounds, reported The Spokesman-Review.

ADVERTISEMENT

The measure makes no exceptions for victims of rape or incest, and a clinic manager testified that her center had treated two rape victims — one whom chose to keep her baby and the other who offered her child for adoption.

Nielson expressed his doubts that those pregnancies were medically possible.

“Now, I’m of the understanding that in many cases of rape it does not involve any pregnancy because of the trauma of the incident,” Nielson said. “That may be true with incest a little bit.”

Women’s health advocates attacked the lawmaker’s claims as “absolutely scientifically and medically inaccurate” — and said they also subjected rape victims to doubts about their accusations if they became pregnant as a result of the assault.

But Nielson stood by his claims — even as he admitted he wasn’t sure whether they were accurate.

ADVERTISEMENT

“That’s information that I’ve had through the years,” he said. “Whether it’s totally accurate or not, I don’t know. In a rape situation, there’s a lot of trauma.”

The lawmaker explained his own interest in the topic.

“I read a lot of information. I have read it several times,” Nielson said. “Being a father of five girls, I’ve explored this a lot.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The idea that rape is unlikely to result in pregnancy dates back to at least ancient Greece, and it was even written into law in medieval England.

It’s since been proven incorrect by science and medicine, but the notion persists in the minds of some anti-choice Republican legislators.

ADVERTISEMENT

Idaho state Rep. Vito Barbieri (R-Dalton Gardens), speaking last year before the same legislative committee, asked a physician during an abortion-related hearing whether it would be possible for a woman to swallow a camera to conduct a gynecological exam.

“It cannot be done in pregnancy simply because, when you swallow a pill, it would not end up in the vagina,” said Dr. Julie Madsen, prompting loud laughter from within the chamber.

Rep. Todd Akin (R-MO) doomed his U.S. Senate bid in 2012 when he suggested that victims of “legitimate rape” would not likely become pregnant because “the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Listen to audio of Nielson’s comments posted online by Planned Parenthood Votes Northwest:


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

In a secluded region in Russia’s Arctic they are rejecting Putin in rare protest

Published

on

Lyudmila Laptander, an activist advocating autonomy for her mineral-rich Nenets region in the Russian Arctic, worries authorities are planning to sacrifice its traditions for the promise of economic enrichment.

"If Nenets is merged with another region, I worry that no one will look after our language or our traditions, and that our small villages in the tundra will be forgotten," said Laptander, 61, a member of the Yasavey cultural group.

The autonomous region on the edge of the Arctic Ocean was gripped by protests in May against the government's plans to integrate it with neighbouring Arkhangelsk.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

People are paying to hire this donkey to crash their Zoom meetings

Published

on

The coronavirus pandemic has led millions of people to embrace meetings via Zoom, but admittedly, those can be as tedious as in-person conferences.

So one animal sanctuary in Canada, in dire need of cash after being forced to close to visitors, found a way to solve both problems.

Meet Buckwheat, a donkey at the Farmhouse Garden Animal Home, who is ready to inject some fun into your humdrum work-from-home office day -- for a price.

"Hello. We are crashing your meeting, we are crashing your meeting -- this is Buckwheat," says sanctuary volunteer Tim Fors, introducing the gray and white animal on a Zoom call.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Republican senators are suddenly trying to social distance — from Trump

Published

on

There’s something interesting in today’s news:

A number of Republican Senators have said they are skipping the Republican National Convention this year. The convention was originally scheduled in Charlotte, North Carolina, but at Trump’s insistence was relocated to Jacksonville, Florida, last month. The stated reason was that Democratic North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper would not commit to permitting a full convention out of concerns about the spread of coronavirus, but the abrupt switch to Florida, less than 80 days before the convention, still seems odd to me. Regardless, the switch has created a new problem: Florida is in the midst of a dramatic spike in coronavirus cases, setting a record for new cases in a single day during the weekend —11,458—and running low of ICU beds.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image