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Here are 10 things we learned from Super Tuesday

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Here’s what we learned after 12 states and one US territory cast their votes for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations Tuesday night

Super Tuesday is over – notwithstanding a lot of delegate math left to be done, and that tardy Alaska caucuses result (with 22.2% reporting, Donald Trump leads Ted Cruz 35.9%-33.1%). Here’s what we learned:

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  • Donald Trump is not the Republican nominee … yet.
  • Nevertheless, it was a big night for the New York billionaire, and for Hillary Clinton. They won seven states each, picked up armloads of delegates and advanced their respective claims on their parties’ presidential nominations.
  • It’s not over yet. On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders’s four state victories keep the race alive, and on the Republican side Ted Cruz’s big win in Texas and second win in Oklahoma do the same.
  • Florida senator Marco Rubio had a tough night. He won only one state – Minnesota – and fell short of the 20% minimum needed to earn delegates in Texas, Alabama and Vermont. He appeared to fall 100+ delegates behind Cruz.
  • Rubio vowed to fight on, telling supporters the race was in its early stages and he would start to clean up later this month.
  • Our comprehensive results page is here . (This isn’t something we learned tonight but this seems like a good place to mention it.)
  • Clinton profited from giant 60- to 80-point margins among African American voters across the South.
  • What about Ben Carson and John Kasich? Kasich came in second in Vermont. Carson was in contention nowhere. Kasich called on Rubio to drop out and Carson said: “I will remain.”
  • The races could resolve dramatically in the next two weeks. Nine states host contests between now and 15 March, when the contests suddenly become winner-take-all and crucial states, including Florida, Ohio and North Carolina, will vote.
  • As for color, there was a strange Trump victory-rally-slash-press-conference that ran interminably long. What made it strange was New Jersey governor Chris Christie, who endorsed Trump last Friday, and introduced him and then stood behind him the whole time. But the look on Christie’s face was one of doom. The internet noticed .

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media 2016


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