Quantcast
Connect with us

Idaho sheriff who opposed new rape kit law apologizes for saying most rapes are ‘consensual’

Published

on

An Idaho sheriff who criticized the state legislature for creating a statewide system for tracking rape kits while saying most rapes were consensual, has apologized on the sheriff’s department Facebook, the Idaho Statesman reports.

Bingham County Sheriff Craig Rowland received national attention when he told a local reporter that it wasn’t necessary for medical clinics to use rape kits to collect forensic evidence after a suspected sexual assault According to Rowland, that determination should be left to law enforcement officers.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rowland added, “The majority of our rapes — not to say that we don’t have rapes, we do — but the majority of our rapes that are called in, are actually consensual sex.”

Faced with a storm of criticism, Rowland apologized on Facebook, while adding that he and his family had been threatened.

“I want to explain what I was trying to say in the interview. I misspoke when I said the majority of our rape cases are consensual sex,” he wrote. “The meaning behind my statement that has been misunderstood is that when a case is called into the dispatch center each and every one is thoroughly investigated. A Deputy is sent to every one of these cases and that Deputy then in turn contacts the on-call detective to help with the investigation. In some of these cases through the investigation it may be determined that the sex was consensual, but not always. In these types of cases after the investigation is complete and it was determined that the sex was consensual. I don’t believe that those kits should be sent to the lab.”

Rowland stated that the time allowed him in the interview made it difficult to fully explain get into the details.

He then apologized and said that since the story went viral, he now knows “what it is like to be cyber-bullied.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“I know that it is hard for victims to come forward on sexual assault cases. I spoke to a rape victim today and told her that I knew it was hard for her to come forward. I want to apologize to anyone who I might have offended with my statement as my main responsibility is to the public’s safety and well being and maintaining their trust.,” he wrote. “I can also say with regret that I now know what it is like to be cyber bullied. Not only have I been threatened but so has my family. I hope that this will clear things up a bit.”

 


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Italy’s COVID-19 death toll tops 10,000 despite long coronavirus lockdown

Published

on

The coronavirus toll in Italy shot past 10,000 on Saturday and showed little sign of slowing despite a 16-day lockdown.

The 889 new fatalities reported in the world's worst-hit nation came a day after it registered 969 deaths on Friday -- the highest single toll since the COVID-19 virus emerged late last year.

Italy now looks certain to extend its economically debilitating -- and emotionally stressful -- business closures and the ban on public gatherings past their April 3 deadline.

"Is it time to reopen the country? I think we have to think about it really carefully," civil protection service chief Angelo Borrelli told reporters.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Joe Biden has one key coronavirus question he wants answered: ‘Where are the tests, Mr. President?’

Published

on

Despite the inability to hold campaign rallies, the 2020 presidential campaign is continuing in spite of the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis.

With the response to coronavirus being the top public policy discussion in America, all eyes are focused on President Donald Trump's actions.

Trump had promised the nation that he would set up COVID-19 drive-thru testing sites in the parking lots of big-box retailers but has so far failed to deliver.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Banks are causing a cash crisis by tightening lending standards during coronavirus crisis

Published

on

Major banks in America are tightening access to credit as coronavirus shutdowns put households across America in dire financial shape, The Wall Street Journal reported Saturday.

"Banks and financial-technology firms are starting to toughen their approval standards for new loans to consumers and small businesses. That means many people could find it hard to get credit just when they most need it, as the novel coronavirus pandemic puts thousands out of work," the newspaper reported.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image