Quantcast
Connect with us

Van Jones rips DNC chair over rift between Sanders and Nevada Dems: ‘I think she made it worse’

Published

on

Van Jones speaks to ABC News on March 2, 2014.

CNN commentator Van Jones criticized Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) on Tuesday for weighing in on the dispute between the Nevada Democratic Party and Sen. Bernie Sanders.

READ MORE: Van Jones escalates war with Debbie Wasserman Schultz: ‘I wish Reince Priebus was my party chair’

“If you’re gonna come out, you’re gonna talk about violence, and you’re the DNC chair, you’ve gotta be fair about it. I think she made it worse,” Jones said. “We need to bring these people together — that did not happen.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Jones’ remarks came after a back-and-forth between the Vermont senator and the party regarding the incident at the party convention over the weekend. Sanders released a statement saying that while he condemns any violence, he rejected accusations from state leaders that his campaign had a “penchant for violence.”

“That is nonsense. Our campaign has held giant rallies all across this country, including in high-crime areas, and there have been zero reports of violence,” Sanders’ statement read.

The state party responded by accusing him of “continuing to lie” about the incident in a statement of its own.

“We respect and admire Senator Sanders for his values and leadership in the United States Senate, but the Sanders campaign is continuing to be dishonest about what happened Saturday and is failing to adequately denounce the threats of violence of his supporters,” the party said.

Wasserman Schultz later told Jones’ colleague Wolf Blitzer that she had not spoken to the senator about the incident, or about death threats against state chair Roberta Lange and her children from people who identified themselves as Sanders supporters.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Unfortunately, the senator’s response was anything but acceptable,” she said. “It certainly did not condemn the supporters for the violence and added more fuel to the fire.”

Jones described the congresswoman’s remarks as unwise given the situation.

“I don’t think that that was wise for her to do that. First of all, Bernie did say in his statement that he was against the violence,” he argued. “Also, if you want to talk about violence, only one person’s been arrested; it was a Hillary Clinton supporter, Wendell Pierce, arrested for assaulting a Sanders supporter.”

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s closing argument to women: ‘We’re getting your husbands back to work’

Published

on

One week before the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump made his closing argument to women at a campaign rally in Lansing, Michigan.

"I love women and I can't help it, they're the greatest," Trump said, four years after the Access Hollywood tape was released which showed him bragging about sexually assaulting strangers.

"I love them much more than the men," he added.

Trump also made an economic argument that sounded as dated as his talk about "suburban housewives."

"We're getting your husbands -- they want to get back to work, right? We're getting your husbands back to work," he argued.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump chants ‘COVID!’ ten times in a row after Obama slams him as ‘jealous’ of virus

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Tuesday again complained about the amount of media coverage being given to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Trump made the remarks at a campaign event in Lansing, Michigan, where he reminded supporters that he had been infected by the virus.

"I would like to give me full credit," the president said of his recovery. "I don't want to give the drug any credit. I want to say, because I am a very young person that's in perfect physical shape, I took that virus and I woke up the next morning and I felt like Superman."

Trump then motioned to members of the media at the event.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump abruptly pulls ads out of Florida as his campaign funds dwindle: report

Published

on

President Trump's campaign has withdrawn advertising from the state of Florida, shifting its dwindling funds to the "industrial northern states" that carried him to victory in 2016, Bloomberg reports.

In the final week of the campaign, Trump is focusing all his energy on the battleground states of Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Pennsylvania -- where polls show he's behind Joe Biden with the exception of Ohio.

"Since the beginning of the fall campaign on Labor Day, Trump has cut $24 million from his national ad budget, while former Vice President Joe Biden has added $197 million," Bloomberg reports. "Biden has outspent Trump three-to-one over that time."

Continue Reading
 
 
Democracy is in peril. Invest in progressive news. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE