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North Carolina governor tells homeschoolers he’s not budging on anti-LGBT bathroom law

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North Carolina’s embattled Tea Party Gov. Pat McCrory told a gathering of Christian home schoolers that he intends to stand firm on the controversial state law known as H.B. 2, the so-called “bathroom bill.”

The Winston-Salem Journal said that McCrory was addressing annual North Carolinians for Home Education conference when he made the remarks, pledging to fight for what he called “respect for privacy” and to uphold “the norms that have been working for generations.”

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“One other advantage of home schooling,” the governor said, “is you aren’t going to have the president, the attorney general or the mayor of Charlotte telling you what bathroom (to use).”

Again, the former Duke Energy executive foisted the blame for the law on Democrats, who he said forced the issue when the city of Charlotte passed nondiscrimination ordinances that included protections for transgender individuals as well as lesbians and gays.

Republican legislators threw together H.B. 2 in a rushed 12-hour session. The law’s two most notorious tenets dictate that all North Carolinians must use public restrooms and other facilities that correspond to their biological sex rather than their expressed gender. The second part of the law — which has raised considerable alarm among the state’s legal watchdogs — prohibits anyone from suing at the state level on grounds of employment discrimination.

The backlash against the state was swift and furious, with companies like PayPal canceling plans to open a service center in North Carolina and performers like Bruce Springsteen canceling their concerts there.

The state’s Attorney General Roy Cooper — a Democrat who currently running against McCrory for governor — has declared that his office will not defend H.B. 2 in court.

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“We’re talking about discrimination here,” said Cooper in March. “Not only is this new law a national embarrassment, it will set North Carolina’s economy back.”

A spokesman for Cooper’s campaign said on Thursday, “Attorney General Cooper continues to stand against this discriminatory law that is driving jobs and people away from our state.”

McCrory’s campaign responded by accusing Cooper of “gross incompetence” and urging him to step down from his position.

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In his speech to the homeschooling conference, McCrory said, “He’s been half in his job and half out of his job with regards to representing the state of North Carolina. If you’re going to be the lawyer, you’ve got to be all in or not in at all.”

Not all of North Carolina’s Republicans are willing to toe McCrory’s hard line on the question of H.B. 2. Earlier this week, Sen. Richard Burr (R) said that he is willing to “roll back” the law’s most controversial statutes.

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Citing the potential for damage to the state’s economy and reputation, Burr — who, like McCrory, is up for re-election — said, “It’s now time for the General Assembly to take the opportunity that if we can roll this back, that it’s probably in the best interests of North Carolina.”


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Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan to give up royal titles — ‘the hardest #Megxit possible’

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Britain's Prince Harry and his wife Meghan will give up their royal titles and public funding as part of a settlement with the Queen to start a new life away from the British monarchy.

The historic announcement from Buckingham Palace on Saturday follows more than a week of intense private talks aimed at managing the fallout of the globetrotting couple's shock resignation from front-line royal duties.

It means Queen Elizabeth II's grandson Harry and his American TV actress wife Meghan will stop using the titles "royal highness" -- the same fate that befell his late mother Princess Diana after her divorce from Prince Charles in 1996.

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GOP senator tells home-state press that impeachment trial must be ‘viewed as fair’: report

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Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) spoke to local reporters on Saturday about her role in the upcoming Donald Trump impeachment trial.

Murkowski explained she would likely vote with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on an initial vote on whether to allow witnesses. However, she left the door open to voting for witnesses after House impeachment managers make their opening case.

"I don't know what more we need until I have been given the base case," she said. "We will have that opportunity to say 'yes' or 'no' ... and if we say 'yes,' the floor is open."

Overall, Murkowski said it was important for the trial to been viewed as fair.

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White House press secretary urged to do her job: ‘We don’t pay you to be a Twitter troll’

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White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham was blasted on Saturday over the confusion resulting from her refusal to hold daily press briefings.

CNN senior media reporter Oliver Darcy was alarmed that Grisham's assistant, Hogan Gidley, was forcing reporters to refer to his remarks as coming from a "sources close to the President's legal team."

Darcy noted that Trump had repeatedly questioned the veracity of unnamed sources, making it problematic for Gidley to demand to be quoted as such.

https://twitter.com/oliverdarcy/status/1218704788432572422

Grisham responded to the criticism and asked Darcy to "stop with the righteous indignation.

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