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Ted Nugent brags about ‘sexy gals’ at concert so poorly-attended that tickets dropped from $67 to $5

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Ted Nugent, who occasionally takes time away from making racist and anti-Semitic statements to play music, failed to draw much of a crowd at a Friday night concert, driving the promoters to end “Laconiafest” in New Hampshire a day early, the Laconia Daily Sun reports.

According to Ultimate Classic Rock, Friday night was the kick-off Nugent’s summer 2016 Sonic Baptizm tour. He gave the website an interview after the show where he appeared to have a different concept of reality, boasting that it had gone well.

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“There sure were a gaggle of beautiful, sexy, skinny gals out there tonight and as always, it is incredibly inspiring to see everybody smiling and dancing to my songs,” he told UCR. “Tonight was an out of the park musical home run! Lucky, lucky me!”

According to the Sun, the festival has been beset by abysmal ticket sales and failed to draw much of an audience Friday — even though tickets to see Nugent were slashed from $67 for general admission to $5. The band scheduled to play Saturday cancelled.

What’s worse is that the promoters appeared to have picked up and run, leaving the city and employees with unpaid bills and wages, according to the Sun.

Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler and Poison’s Bret Michaels also played during the middle of the week and managed to attract larger crowds, the Sun reports.

“However, by Friday management of what remained of the event had changed hands and employees had been let go, many owed unpaid wages.”

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Nugent last toured in 2014, but was beset by controversy. Some venues cancelled shows amid complaints over his racist comments. Nugent blamed the cancellations on “sick, sick, stoned, hygiene-challenged Michael Moore fans [who] call all the promoters, they call all the venues, they call all my sponsors, every day.”


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