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Josh Duggar won’t apologize for sex abuse and adultery: ‘He believes external forces were to blame’

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Josh Duggar may — or maybe not, depending on the source — be returning to his family’s TLC reality show.

The prolific evangelical family is hurting for money, despite their occasional and flagrant abuse of free-food giveaways at fast-food joints, so they’re at least considering cashing in their eldest son’s molestation and adultery scandals for TV ratings.

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“Josh will appear on the next season of his sisters’ series,” a source told InTouch. “The plan is for him to address everything he’s done. What he has to say will be ratings gold, and TLC — and the Duggars — know it.”

The 28-year-old Duggar resigned from his job with the anti-LGBT Family Research Council last year after admitting to molesting four of his sisters and another girl while they were sleeping about a decade earlier.

He then entered a Christian rehabilitation center for months after admitting to extramarital affairs when the Ashley Madison hack revealed his accounts on the adultery website.

The source said Duggar would address those scandals, but he would not apologize.

“Josh will cover everything and he will maintain the family line that God has saved his soul and guided him back to the right path,” the source said. “But one thing you probably won’t hear is that he’s actually sorry, as he believes that external forces were to blame for his behavior.”

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However, another report strongly disputed rumors that Duggar would appear on his sisters’ spinoff TLC program, “Jill & Jessa: Counting On.”

Their parents, Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar, have reportedly been torn apart by their eldest son’s sex abuse, pornography addiction and infidelities.

The couple apparently disagreed on how to punish their adult son for his embarrassing mistakes, which led to the cancellation of their own popular TLC reality TV show, “19 and Counting.”

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