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New York City police commissioner William Bratton to resign Tuesday

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New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton on Tuesday will announce his resignation as the head of the largest city police force in the United States, according to several media reports.

Mayor Bill de Blasio scheduled a news conference for noon at City Hall to make “an NYPD-related announcement.” Representatives for the Police Department and for the mayor’s office would not confirm that Bratton was set to step down.

Regarded as a celebrity in the world of law enforcement, Bratton, 68, was credited with sharply cutting crime in New York City and gaining the moniker “supercop” as police commissioner before leaving to work in the private sector.

De Blasio brought Bratton back to take over the department in 2014, 18 years after he first held the position under then-Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Bratton, who started his career as an officer in Boston in 1970, has also overseen the police departments in Boston and Los Angeles.

He is known as a strong supporter of the “broken windows” theory, which holds that preventing minor infractions such as vandalism and public drinking can help lower the number of more serious crimes.

In New York, Bratton applied the theory by cracking down on petty crimes. Supporters have credited his policing strategy with helping to contribute to the city’s drastic reductions in crime since the 1990s, while critics have assailed the tactics as heavy-handed.

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In his first turn as police commissioner, Bratton introduced the CompStat system of tracking crime statistics in real time, which has since been adopted by numerous police departments as a crime-fighting tool.

(Reporting by Joseph Ax; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

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Trump’s first term: hits and misses

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"Promises made, promises kept," goes one of President Donald Trump's main 2020 reelection slogans. Is that true?

Here are some of the key policy hits and misses -- comparing his accomplishments to his promises -- from a tumultuous first term.

- HITS -

Economy:

The economy will be Trump's major selling point.

GDP grew 3.1 percent in the first quarter of 2019 and the last recession was a decade ago. Unemployment is at a 50-year low of 3.6 percent.

Trump's frequent claim that the economy is probably "the best" in US history is an exaggeration, though.

Economists see growing dangers, including exploding government debt and growing backlash from Trump's aggressive trade policies, especially with China.

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The racist roots of American policing

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Outrage over racial profiling and the killing of African Americans by police officers and vigilantes in recent years helped give rise to the Black Lives Matter movement.

But tensions between the police and black communities are nothing new.

There are many precedents to the Ferguson, Missouri protests that ushered in the Black Lives Matter movement. Those protests erupted in 2014 after a police officer shot unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown; the officer was subsequently not indicted.

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Ocasio-Cortez: ‘We’re going to fight to repeal the Hyde Amendment’

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) started a petition Saturday seeking to repeal the Hyde Amendment, which bars the use of federal funds for abortions, arguing the restriction overwhelmingly harms low-income Americans and women of color. AOC emailed her supporters:

“Since 1976, our government has banned federal funding for abortion care — specifically, for Medicaid recipients. Countless studies have shown that due to this amendment, millions of women have been forced to go through with pregnancies that, given the funding, they would have otherwise terminated. "

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