Beyond the 'Skittles' meme: 5 times Donald Trump Jr. palled around with racists in the last 6 months
Donald Trump Jr. a katz / Shutterstock.com

In case you haven't noticed, Donald Trump Jr. seems to have some real issues when it comes to posting memes from white supremacists on his social media accounts.


And just how does Trump Jr. stumble across these white supremacist memes, you ask? A lot of it has to do with the fact that he follows a lot of white supremacists on Twitter.

As Little Green Footballs noted earlier this year, Trump Jr. follows an infamous white nationalist who goes by the name of @Ricky_Vaughn99 on Twitter. Trump Jr. also followed a since-suspended user who went by the name of "AdolfJoeBiden" who frequently posted messages about American becoming a "mongrel nation" filled with non-whites.

To get the full picture of Trump Jr.'s flirtation with white supremacy, let's go over all the times he has posted memes created by white nationalists, or just generally palled around with them, on social media.

Last week, Trump Jr. posted the following photo on Instagram of "The Deplorables" that featured Pepe the Frog, a cartoon that has been appropriated by neo-Nazis to show support for Donald Trump's candidacy:

Then there was the time that Trump Jr. retweeted Kevin MacDonald, a notoriously anti-Semitic psychology professor who runs a website that's dedicated to  "White Identity, Interests, and Culture":

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Last night, Trump Jr. tweeted out a meme that compared Syrian refugees to poisoned Skittles:

Why Skittles, you ask? Because it was the candy being carried by Trayvon Martin on the night he was fatally shot by George Zimmerman. White supremacists now use Skittles as a metaphor to talk about the dangers that minorities pose to the United States, as they believe allowing more people of color into the country will result in "poisoning" our national identity.

Interestingly, it seems that Trump Jr.'s affinity for white supremacists goes back to this past March, when he was interviewed by a white nationalist on the Utah-based "Liberty Roundtable" radio program. Trump Jr. also cited white nationalist Vox Day to falsely claim that a Trump supporter who gave a Nazi salute during a protest was actually a secret supporter of Bernie Sanders.

And we haven't even gotten into Trump Jr.'s insistence that there's nothing at all racist about the Confederate flag.

The only plausible defense of Donald Trump Jr. is that he's simply too ignorant to understand that all of the people he's allying himself here are white nationalists. While that's more likely than not the case, it isn't really much of an excuse, either.