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CNN’s Angela Rye crushes GOP shill’s call for Muslim profiling: ‘I know Trump team is allergic to facts’

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CNN commentator Angela Rye was left shaking her head in disbelief as Donald Trump surrogate John Phillips defended the candidate’s call for targeted scrutiny of Muslim immigrants.

Trump suggested that the New York and New Jersey bomber would have been captured if the United States engaged in the type of racial and religious profiling that Israel does. That type of profiling only occurs at airports, but since Ahmad Khan Rahami is a U.S.-born citizen it wouldn’t have done anything to help.

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Phillips blamed the “culture of political correctness” caused by Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama for terrorism. “If you go back to clock boy, when all of that was going on in the state of Texas, and those teachers saw something they thought was suspicious, they dropped a dime and were roundly criticized as bigots,” he said, referring to Ahmed Mohamed, who crafted a clock from some scrap parts and was accused of bringing a bomb to school.

Rye shook her head. “I was taking offense to the term clock boy,” she began. “I’m interested to see what John thinks happened there. I think the bigger issue here is what Donald Trump’s response was today, which was to encourage profiling.”

Rye cited scholarly research that proves profiling doesn’t work and often only exacerbates problems. “I know that Trump team is allergic to actual facts and research and data, but research demonstrates profiling actually does not — is not an effective tool against terrorism. If you look at the fact that Rahami’s family was targeted by harassment, discrimination and all that is listed in their lawsuit, it is very, very clear that it actually — it actually has the opposite effect.”

Lemon played the clip of Trump citing Israel’s practice of profiling. “Do we have a choice?” Trump asked his audience. “Look what is going on. Do we really have a choice? we are trying to be so politically correct in our country, and it is only going to get worse.”

Rye clarified that Trump has absolutely no idea what he’s talking about. “He’s talking about racial and religious litmus tests and bias in trying to profile on those particular issues. That’s not what Israeli profiling does. It is a totally different type of profiling,” she said.

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Phillips ignored Rye’s evidence and instead talked about the bomber’s lawsuit while she interjected “You missed the point” several times.

“That wasn’t my point. Maybe that’s your point,” Rye said. “But my point was that the types of harassment that Donald Trump is suggesting … has the opposite effect. It does not combat terrorism. There is research that demonstrates that, and I know you all are not aware but those are the facts.”

Trump supporter Bruce LeVell declared that there were no terrorist incidents between 9/11 and 2008, but claimed that terrorism has been overwhelming since President Obama took office with Clinton at his side. That assertion is factually inaccurate, according to Politifact, which listed several terrorist attacks in the United States and 20 attacks against Americans on foreign soil.

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“Donald Trump is either saying one of two things,” Bakari Sellers began. “One, it is anti-American saying we want to profile, we want to have these religion litmus tests, something we cannot even ensure will work. We know in New York we’ve had NYPD officers who sat down in Starbucks, in these coffee shops, in these Muslim communities and they bear no fruit. We know that.”

Sellers’ second point is that Trump’s plan to combat ISIS is a secret which means it’s probably imaginary. “As Hillary Clinton said today, we all know the secret is he has no plan.”

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Elections 2016

Vietnamese women strive to clear war-era mines

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Inching across a field littered with Vietnam war-era bombs, Ngoc leads an all-women demining team clearing unexploded ordnance that has killed tens of thousands of people -- including her uncle.

"He died in an explosion. I was haunted by memories of him," Le Thi Bich Ngoc tells AFP as she oversees the controlled detonation of a cluster bomb found in a sealed-off site in central Quang Tri province.

More than 6.1 million hectares of land in Vietnam remain blanketed by unexploded munitions -- mainly dropped by US bombers -- decades after the war ended in 1975.

At least 40,000 Vietnamese have since died in related accidents. Victims are often farmers who accidentally trigger explosions, people salvaging scrap metal, or children who mistake bomblets for toys.

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Elections 2016

Chief Justice John Roberts issues New Year’s Eve warning to stand up for democracy

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In a progressive welcoming move, Chief Justice John Roberts issued his New Year's Eve annual report urging his fellow federal judges to stand up for democracy.

"In our age, when social media can instantly spread rumor and false information on a grand scale, the public's need to understand our government, and the protections it provides, is ever more vital," he wrote. "We should celebrate our strong and independent judiciary, a key source of national unity and stability."

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Trump’s next 100 days will dictate whether he can be re-elected or not — here’s why

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According to CNN pollster-in-residence Harry Enten, Donald Trump's next 100 days -- which could include an impeachment trial in the Senate -- will hold the key to whether he will remain president in 2020.

As Eten explains in a column for CNN, "His [Trump's] approval rating has been consistently low during his first term. Yet his supporters could always point out that approval ratings before an election year have not historically been correlated with reelection success. But by mid-March of an election year, approval ratings, though, become more predictive. Presidents with low approval ratings in mid-March of an election year tend to lose, while those with strong approval ratings tend to win in blowouts and those with middling approval ratings usually win by small margins."

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