Quantcast
Connect with us

‘All of a sudden I’m a pariah’: Mel Gibson is ‘annoyed’ people won’t shut up about his anti-Semitism

Published

on

When Mel Gibson went off on a drunken anti-Semitic rant in 2006 his career took a big hit. In the ten years since, he’s struggled to get back on track, despite numerous attempts to clean up his image.

But in a recent interview with Variety, Mediaite noticed that Gibson has been “annoyed” by people who won’t let it go.

Gibson calls his 2006 arrest where he blamed “f*cking Jews” for “all the wars in the world,” an “unfortunate incident.” Gibson apologized but he blamed the incident on alcohol. Today’s interview he blames it on the alcohol, anger and the police, claiming he was recorded without his consent.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I was recorded illegally by an unscrupulous police officer who was never prosecuted for that crime,” Gibson said, attempting to blame someone else for his problems. “And then it was made public by him for profit, and by members of — we’ll call it the press. So, not fair. I guess as who I am, I’m not allowed to have a nervous breakdown, ever.”

It’s unclear what Gibson means when he says “we’ll call it the press.” Regardless, he’s moved on and wishes everyone else would too.

“For me, it’s a dim thing in the past. But others bring it up, which kind of, I find annoying because I don’t understand why after 10 years it’s any kind of issue. Surely, if I was really what they say I was, some kind of hater, there’d be evidence of actions somewhere. There never has been.”

Gibson has many other anti-Semitic stories that have plagued him over the years. Many Jewish groups argued that Gibson’s “Passion of the Christ” was anti-Semitic. When Gibson announced he was going to do a sequel to the film, he was burned on Twitter with many bringing up his anti-Semitism.

In September, right-wing radio host Glenn Beck revealed that he blamed “Jewish people” for stealing his Christ movie. According to Beck, Gibson believes those same Jews used the film to attack him and make his life a living hell before the film was released.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I expected Hollywood to not like it, but I lost my friends,” Gibson said, according to Beck. “People wouldn’t even speak to me because I made this movie… All of a sudden, I’m a pariah.”

It seems Gibson can’t quite figure out who to blame, but it certainly isn’t him. Regardless, he argues that he’s never discriminated against someone for being Jewish, so that should prove he isn’t anti-Semitic.

“And for one episode in the back of a police car on eight double tequilas to sort of dictate all the work, life’s work and beliefs and everything else that I have and maintain for my life is really unfair,” Gibson said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Listen to the full audio below:


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s obsession with wrecking Obamacare is pushing him into a political buzzsaw: report

Published

on

President Donald Trump's administration has asked the Supreme Court to strike down the entire Affordable Care Act at a time when the United States is suffering from a deadly pandemic.

An Axios analysis written by Drew Altman of the Kaiser Family Foundation argues that Trump's insistence on demolishing all of Obamacare puts him at odds not just with Democratic and independent voters, but also a majority of Republican voters.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Big chain retailers — including Target and Home Depot — beg government to enforce standard mask-wearing nationwide

Published

on

In a letter sent to the National Governors Association, an industry group representing many of the largest retailers in the U.S. asked the country's governors to mandate and enforce rules requiring people to wear masks at all times while in public.

With the coronavirus spiking dramatically in some states, the Retail Industry Leaders Association, which represents Target and Home Depot among others, sent the letter on Monday, reports CBS News.

One major issue has been the increasing incidence of angry shoppers attacking employees due to non-standardized rules on masks.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump is betting on reckless approach to win in November

Published

on

On the Fourth of July, a day meant to celebrate American independence, Donald Trump once again focused on creating a racist spectacle. Despite concerns about spreading the coronavirus and starting wildfires, Trump insisted on having a fireworks-heavy celebration at Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, which was clearly a campaign rally no matter how much the taxpayers were bilked for it. Of course, the president's speech was pure culture-war vitriol, complete with classic Trumpian projection, this time when he called anti-racist activists "fascists," an extraordinary word choice that obviously better suits him.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image