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Donald Trump’s DC hotel takes a hit as his toxic campaign spirals out of control

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Donald Trump’s White House bid has been confusing from the start. It’s been unclear to many why the real estate mogul would ditch his reality TV lifestyle to run for president of the United States.

Maybe it was an elaborate marketing plan — he did tout his various products throughout his campaign.

However, as the GOP nominee plows through the end of the election on a sinking ship, it looks like he might be taking his brand down with him, NY Mag reports.

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Think back to March during Trump’s Super Tuesday 2 speech. He spoke about his Trump Water, Trump Steaks, Trump University, Trump Airlines, Trump Wine, Trump Vodka, and Trump Magazine. 

But after the released tape of the GOP nominee bragging about sexually assaulting women, and the various women who have come forward since then to share their stories, Donald Trump’s campaign is spiraling out of control.

These latest revelations about the Donald’s treatment of women may have been enough to negatively impact his current and future business ventures long after Election Day.

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According to NY Mag, Trump’s DC Hotel appears to be having some trouble filling its rooms, which are also now coming at a heavily discounted price. Rooms that would normally go for about $800 were listed for as low as $445 per night, NY Mag writes.

The outlet noted, “Trump promised to offer luxurious suites to lure business execs and diplomats, but many of the international elite appear to be avoiding it.”

Ada Pena, a DC travel agent suggested that this was due to the “political atmosphere,” adding that people don’t want to be asked “why are you staying here?”

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Pena also said, “It’s a shame that it is called Trump because it’s a beautiful property. But overall, his brand is hurting.”

Trump’s campaign and his brand taking a plummet wouldn’t be his first failed business venture, but it’s hard to say whether his name will recover.

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Ivanka Trump and dossier author Christopher Steele maintained a years-long correspondence

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Dossier author Christopher Steele met Ivanka Trump nearly a decade before her father's election campaign, and they corresponded for years.

The relationship was alluded to in the Department of Justice inspector general's report released Monday, showing that Steele was favorably disposed to Donald Trump and his family due to the relationship.

ABC News confirmed that Steele and the president's daughter had met at a dinner in 2007, and Ivanka Trump corresponded with the former British spy about a possible working relationship.

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Inspector general found ‘no evidence of political bias’ in Trump-Russia probe: report

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Inspector General Michael Horowitz's report on the origins of the probe into the Trump campaign's contacts with Russia has found that there was no evidence of political bias on the part of law enforcement officials who began the investigation.

The Associated Press reports that the report "is expected to conclude there was an adequate basis for opening one of the most politically sensitive investigations in FBI history and one that Trump has denounced as a witch hunt."

The IG's report also found that former British spy Christopher Steele, whose infamous dossier on Trump featured salacious allegations about the president and Russian prostitutes, played no role in the opening of the probe, despite claims from Trump's Republican allies who argued that it was central to the investigation.

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DOJ argues Congress can’t stop Trump Org from taking foreign payments — despite Constitution’s emoluments clause

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The so-called emoluments clause has been the center of a case that many legal scholars have been making that President Donald Trump is regularly violating the Constitution by continuing to accept payments from foreign governments via his businesses.

The Washington Post reports that an attorney from the Trump Department of Justice argued on Monday that the emoluments clause doesn't actually prevent Trump from accepting payments from foreign governments, even though the clause specifically states that "no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State."

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