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Pope Francis says teaching gender theory is ‘insidious indoctrination’

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Pope Francis has said teaching children gender theory in schools was an “insidious indoctrination”, even as he insisted he had always treated homosexuals and transsexuals with respect.

“It is one thing to have homosexual tendencies or a sex change,” the pope said in comments to journalists made on board the papal plane after he wrapped up a three-day tour in the Caucasus and headed home to Rome.

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“But it is another thing to teach it in schools.”

Trying to “change attitudes” like this is “ideological colonisation,” the pope said, building on comments he made Saturday in Tbilisi, when he argued that gender theory was part of a “global war” on traditional family values and marriage.

Gender theory is, broadly speaking, the idea that while people may be biologically male or female, they may choose to identify as male or female — or both or neither.

When asked about his attitude to homosexual or transsexual people, Pope Francis repeated his call that they should be welcomed, accepted and integrated into society as much as possible.

“I accompanied people with these tendencies, with homosexual practices, I brought them closer to the Lord,” he said.

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“Some were not able (to follow the church’s teachings), but I never abandoned one of them,” he said.

The pontiff, who took the papal name Francis in homage to Saint Francis of Assisi, the Christian friar devoted to the downtrodden, told reporters about a Spanish person who had a sex change to become a man and then married a woman.

A local priest told the couple they would “go to hell”, which caused them great suffering, but after they wrote to Francis, the pope received them and treated them with dignity, he said.

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“Life is life, and things should be taken as they come,” the pope said.

“Please don’t write that the pope will sanctify transsexuals. I can see the front pages of papers now,” he added.

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“It is a moral question, and it must be resolved as best as possible, always with the mercy of God.”

Earlier in his papacy, Francis famously said “who am I to judge?” about homosexuality but in April this year refused to recognise same sex couples in new Church guidelines on family life.


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North Korea announces ‘test of very great importance’ occurred at the Sohae Satellite Launching Ground: report

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North Korea state media reported on a "successful" test at a missile launch site.

"A very important test took place at the Sohae Satellite Launching Ground on the afternoon of December 7, 2019," a spokesperson for the Academy of the National Defense Science said.

The spokesperson said the test was "of great significance to the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea.

https://twitter.com/nktpnd/status/1203486463209431041

#UPDATE North Korea conducts a "very important test" at its Sohae satellite launch site, state media reports, as nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington remain deadlocked https://t.co/abYhRDvBic pic.twitter.com/neCYEQTEhf

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Here’s why Ukrainians are shocked about Rudy Giuliani’s new associate

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President Donald Trump's personal attorney is causing "shock" among Ukrainians for working with Andrey Artemenko, according to new reports.

"In an attempt to exonerate President Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani has been working with right-wing media outlet One America News Network (OAN) to produce a television special featuring a string of current and former Ukrainian officials defending Trump’s conduct in withholding military aid to Ukraine and seeking investigations of the Bidens," Law & Crime reported Saturday.

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‘Irony and Outrage’: How different — and how similar — are Samantha Bee and Fox News?

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Sean Hannity and Bill O’Reilly are masters of outrage — not just the emotion, but a genre of political theater — just as Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart are masters of ironic satire. They’re poles apart, and yet — ironically or outrageously — they’re profoundly similar, both in how they’re impacting their audiences, and why their genres emerged when they did. That’s perhaps the central thesis of “Irony and Outrage: The Polarized Landscape of Rage, Fear, and Laughter in the United States,” by Dannagal Goldthwaite Young, who’s both a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Delaware and an improv comedian with the troupe ComedySportz Philadelphia. That’s among the many different hats she wears.

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