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Alt-right founder: Trump is the first step in turning America into a vast ‘safe space’ for whites

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The founder of the so-called “alt-right” movement can’t believe Donald Trump actually won — but he envisions the newly elected president as the next step toward a white “ethnostate.”

Richard Spencer, head of the National Policy Institute, told Reveal host Al Letson that Trump represents a new conservatism that’s less interested in “freedom and liberty” than American nationalism.

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Listen to the entire interview posted online by Reveal.

“I don’t think Donald Trump is me, I don’t think Donald Trump is alt-right,” Spencer said. “I don’t think Donald Trump is an identitarian as I would use that term. I think Donald Trump is a kind of first step towards this. He’s the first time that we’ve seen a genuinely if, you could say incomplete, politician who’s fighting for European identity politics in North America. This is the first time we’ve seen it.”

The 38-year-old Spencer’s long-term goal is a white-only ethnostate, although he’s not sure how that could happen in the United States, because he does not think humans from different racial backgrounds can live harmoniously together

“What the ethnostate is, is an ideal,” Spencer said. “It’s a thing, it’s a way of thinking about we want a new type of society that would actually be a homeland for all white people, all European people. So that would include Slavs, that would include Germans, that would include Latins, it who would include people of all ethnicities that we would always have a safe space. We would always have a homeland for us. Very similar to, very similar to how Jews conceive of Israel.”

Letson admitted that he found Spencer charming and articulate, but he pressed the white nationalist to explain how he was different from his ideological predecessors who lynched black Americans.

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“Look, I’m not going to comment about you know some hypothetical Klansman or or whomever,” Spencer said.

Letson refused to let Spencer off the hook, saying that his views had a clear historical connection to anti-black terrorism, even if he was able to make them sound cooly intellectual.

“I’m sure there is some commonality between these movements of the past and what I’m talking about,” Spencer said. “But you really have to judge me on my own terms. Like I am not those people and I don’t fully know, I don’t know in the specifics of what you’re referring to. Like, I am who I am. And you, if you’re going to treat me with good faith, you have to listen to what I’m saying and listen to my ideas. I think someone who would go down the path of becoming a Klansman or something in 2016, I think that is, those people are very different than I am. It’s, it’s a — it’s a non-starter. I think we need an idea. We need a movement that really resonates with where we are right now.”

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Black man adopted by white Alabama family fights for Confederate symbols: ‘I’m not going to take my flag down’

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A Black Alabama man this week said that he was fighting to save Confederate monuments because members of his adopted white family fought in the U.S. Civil War.

WHNT spoke to Daniel Sims outside the courthouse in Marshall County, where activists are calling for the removal of Confederate monuments. Sims said that he opposed the effort to take down the monuments.

"Regardless of how the next person feels, I'm not going to take my flag down," Sims said. "If I've got anything to do with it, ain't no monument going to come down."

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Viewers reject Sarah Palin’s advice to Kamala Harris

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Sarah Palin offered advice to Sen. Kamala Harris on running for vice president, but social media users didn't want to hear it.

The former Republican vice presidential nominee and one-time half-term governor of Alaska appeared Thursday on ABC's "Good Morning America," where she complained about the media coverage of her failed 2008 campaign alongside Sen. John McCain.

"A lot of the coverage of me was quite unfair," Palin said. "I hope that they will treat her fairly, but at the same time, no kid gloves ... the American voter wants to know that we have the most capable people running and who will be elected, regardless of gender, regardless of race."

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CNN fact-checker debunks Pence’s ‘bonkers’ lie about Obama and job creation

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Speaking to Fox News, Vice President Mike Pence tried to put a positive spin on the economy — by taking the economic rebound of the past 3 months, and claiming that the raw number of jobs created during that period beats the entirety of job growth in President Barack Obama's 8-year administration.

We’ve created more jobs in the last 3 months than Joe Biden and Barack Obama created in their 8 years in office. pic.twitter.com/kwk5YhL3TJ

— Mike Pence (@Mike_Pence) August 13, 2020

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