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Nearly half of all Trump voters think leaked Clinton e-mails discussed pedophilia and human trafficking

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It’s no secret some conservative influencers—including Alex Jones, Sean Hannity and even president-elect Donald Trump himself—trafficked in conspiracy theories throughout the 2016 election. After all, Trump’s first real foray into the political arena revolved around his insistence that Barack Obama was in fact born in Kenya, and thus ineligible for the presidency (a racist theory advanced by both Jones and Hannity, who served as de facto hype-men for Trump throughout the campaign).

But a new Economist/YouGov poll shows just how impactful these conspiracies were to voters. The poll reveals that almost half—46 percent—of Trump voters believe leaked emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign discussed pedophilia and human trafficking.

The poll was conducted after an armed man from North Carolina was arrested for trying to “self-investigate” Comet Ping Pong in Washington D.C. over charges the restaurant was a front for a pedophilia ring run by Clinton and her aide John Podesta.

The “fictitious conspiracy theory,” dubbed “pizzagate,” originated on sites like 4chan and Reddit before making its way across social media. It was eventually picked up by fake news websites, including Jones’ Infowars.com. According to the poll, even after the theory was debunked by authorities, “only 29 percent [of American adults] are sure the allegation is ‘definitely’ not true.”

The poll also reveals a remarkable distrust of the intelligence community’s consensus that Russia was responsible for leaking e-mails from the Democratic National Committee and Clinton campaign in the hopes of swinging the election in favor of Trump. While 87 percent of Clinton voters believe it’s “true” that Russia interfered to help the president-elect, a full 80 percent of Trump voters think it’s false. Sixty percent of Trump voters also believe the president-elect’s erroneous claim that “millions of people … voted illegally” in the election.

As for the most prominent conspiracy theory pushed by Trump and co.—that President Obama was born in Kenya? Despite the president-elect’s forced declaration that “President Barack Obama was born in the United States. Period,” half of Trump supporters think it’s “at least probably true” that Obama was born in Kenya

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[h/t Catherine Rampell, @crampellWashington Post]

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Trump Twitter-snarls at ‘Impeachment Day’ protesters as the product of ‘Radical Left Democrats’

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President Donald Trump lashed out at Impeachment Day protesters on Twitter on Sunday morning, downplaying their efforts after seeing a report on Fox News.

Taking to Twitter the president wrote, "Yesterday was the Radical Left Democrats big Impeachment day. They worked so hard to make it something really big and special but had one problem - almost nobody showed up. “The Media admits low turnout for anti-Trump rallies ...saying enough. Democrat voters want to hear the politicians talking about issues. This is a huge distraction and will only help Donald Trump get elected. 'Greatest President since Ronald Reagan' said a counter-protester. LehighValleyLive."

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Trump’s first term: hits and misses

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"Promises made, promises kept," goes one of President Donald Trump's main 2020 reelection slogans. Is that true?

Here are some of the key policy hits and misses -- comparing his accomplishments to his promises -- from a tumultuous first term.

- HITS -

Economy:

The economy will be Trump's major selling point.

GDP grew 3.1 percent in the first quarter of 2019 and the last recession was a decade ago. Unemployment is at a 50-year low of 3.6 percent.

Trump's frequent claim that the economy is probably "the best" in US history is an exaggeration, though.

Economists see growing dangers, including exploding government debt and growing backlash from Trump's aggressive trade policies, especially with China.

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The racist roots of American policing

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Outrage over racial profiling and the killing of African Americans by police officers and vigilantes in recent years helped give rise to the Black Lives Matter movement.

But tensions between the police and black communities are nothing new.

There are many precedents to the Ferguson, Missouri protests that ushered in the Black Lives Matter movement. Those protests erupted in 2014 after a police officer shot unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown; the officer was subsequently not indicted.

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