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War movie ‘Apocalypse Now’ getting its own videogame

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Francis Ford Coppola is developing an interactive, psychological horror videogame based on his epic Vietnam War film “Apocalypse Now,” and is asking the public to contribute $900,000 toward the cost of making it.

The Oscar-winning director launched a Kickstarter page to raise funds for the game, which he said would take about three years to develop. By Thursday, one day after Coppola’s announcement, the fund had reached $55,000.

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The interactive game will involve role playing with gamers taking on the character of U.S. army Captain Willard (played by Martin Sheen in the 1979 movie), who is on a secret mission to assassinate renegade Colonel Kurtz (played by Marlon Brando), the director said in a statement.

“Forty years ago, I set out to make a personal art picture that could hopefully influence generations of viewers for years to come. Today, I’m joined by new daredevils, a team who want to make an interactive version of ‘Apocalypse Now’, where you are Captain Benjamin Willard amidst the harsh backdrop of the Vietnam War,” Coppola said.

“Apocalypse Now” won a best picture Golden Globe but just two Oscars for sound and cinematography. However, it is now regarded as one of the most influential war films of all time and in 2000 was chosen for preservation by the U.S. National Film Registry.

The game, due to launch in 2020, is being developed by Coppola’s privately-held American Zoetrope film studio and some of the teams behind videogame franchises “Battlefield” and “Fallout: New Vegas.”

The $900,000 Kickstarter fund is expected to provide only a portion of the huge costs needed to develop and market the videogame, and is a good way to test the appetite for a product at an early stage, the development team said.

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(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; Editing by Andrew Hay)


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The few police willing to join in solidarity with protesters

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Reports of the protests across the country are focusing on the violence, clashes and property damage caused by a small few rather than the peaceful protest of those rallying against injustice and the police standing in solidarity with them.

A few captured positive moments of cities where officers support the protests and believe Black lives do actually matter.

There were moments of protesters fist-bumping police, hugs with police, and in one incident in New York City over the weekend, one officer was separated from his unit. Protesters surrounded him with locked arms to protect him from those being violent. In Miami, Florida and Seattle, Washington, police joined protesters in kneeling.

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2020 Election

Trump shows all the signs of being ‘rattled’ now that the White House is under siege from protesters: columnist

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In a column for the Atlantic, longtime political observer Peter Nicholas stated that Donald Trump is showing all the signs of a scared man as massive protests have broken out across the country over the murder of George Floyd at the hands of four former Minneapolis cops -- and angry Americans are taking their case all the way up to the White House gates.

As Nicholas wrote, "Presidents live within a protective cocoon built and continually fortified for one purpose: keeping them alive. But inside the White House compound these days, Donald Trump seems rattled by what’s transpiring outside the windows of his historic residence."

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Black Londoner explains George Floyd protester support with story of how cops murdered his brother

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In an interview with MSNBC's Molly Hunter, a Black Londoner explained why he turned out for a protest near Trafalgar Square in support of Americans who have hit the streets in the U.S. over the murder of George Floyd by four former Minneapolis police officers.

According to the man -- identified as Daniel and who was wearing a COVID-19 mask and a New York Yankees hat -- his brother was also murdered by police and the cops walked free.

"You've been marching all day," Hunter began. "Look, I have two questions for you: what was it like watching the U.S. this week from London? Does it resonate?

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