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Trump pitched a ridiculous budget — but even the GOP Congress won’t give him what he wants

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In his first five weeks in office, President Donald Trump has legislated from executive orders, but his budget proposal will need cooperation from Congress. That’s not something to which Washington is accustomed. Like many presidents before him, Trump’s budget will likely get dumbed down to make it more of a plausible law.

A New York Times report lists some of the Trump ideas that likely won’t make it through Congressional approval.

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Proposals sent to Congress for the budget are nothing more than a nonbinding suggestion to members who actually set the budget. While Democrats are in the minority, they still hold key positions on committees that can block or edit Trump’s proposals.

1. The EPA and State Department won’t be gutted.

While Trump wants to make major cuts to the government to help fund his increase in military spending, Congress isn’t likely to approve it.

“Enacting appropriations law — as opposed to proposing nonbinding budget resolutions — will likely require Democratic votes,” Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) told The Times. She serves as the ranking member on the Appropriations Committee.

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2. Trump intends to increase military spending.

While many members love it when the military builds things in their districts, Democrats have signaled that they intend to block any spending that isn’t matched by domestic spending increases. Trump’s proposal offers the opposite with cuts to domestic programs and inflating the Pentagon budget.

Democrats likely to oppose this idea might find allies among fiscal conservatives who have previously refused to increase military spending. Their claims have been that such spending is wasteful. Others, like Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) want to see more money than Trump has proposed, however.

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Democrats also face a possible backlash if the GOP can successfully argue that increased military spending is going to the troops and not defense contractors and the Pentagon. They did derail spending in 2016 negotiations but it’s unclear if they can do it this time. If Democrats give up on this budget point, The Times argues they will sacrifice some of their influence over the budget. Democrats could cause trouble if they agree to the increase but earmark it to go straight to the troops and not the military industrial complex.

3. Trump wants a full budget – he might just get another continuing resolution.

Over the years, Congress has been unable to pass a full budget, relying simply on continuing resolutions to kick the can down the road. As it stands now, the government will run out of money on Sept. 30, which would lead to a government shutdown if no budget or CR is passed. As it stands now, Trump’s budget isn’t likely to get enough support to pass, according to The Times.

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4. Trump says “hands off” on Social Security and Medicare.

Trump’s campaign promise guaranteed he would never touch critical senior programs like Social Security and Medicare. That isn’t exactly what conservatives in Congress want to see.

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) has previously pitched substantial cuts to both programs to find the money to support the budget. If the programs stay in place and Republicans don’t want to add to the deficit it will mean more cuts to other agency budgets, even military spending.

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Trump has figured out how to get taxpayers to renovate one of his golf courses: MSNBC panel

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President Donald Trump has figured out how to have taxpayers pay to renovate his Trump National Doral Miami golf course, according to an analysis by MSNBC's Stephanie Ruhle.

"Before setting himself on fire on Ukraine yesterday, Mick Mulvaney came into the White House briefing room to break to the nation the fact the that the Trump Doral golf resort turns out to be -- in his estimation, organically, just sitting there -- the best possible place to have a G-7 Summit of world leaders," MSNBC's Brian Williams reported. "That was provision number one. There’s no better place that we can find. Number two was, the president will not profit from said G-7."

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Bill Maher reveals plan to ‘bribe’ Trump with one billion dollars — for him to leave office

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The Constitution has two mechanisms to remove President Donald Trump from office prior to his term ending on January 20, 2021: impeachment and the 25th Amendment.

HBO "Real Time" host Bill Maher noted that Trump could also choose to resign.

Maher waved around a $1 million check that he said he would give to Trump to quit.

He said he also knew 1,000 people who would do the same -- which would land Trump over $1 billion.

Maher said even poor people would pawn their wedding rings to add to the pot.

Watch:

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Trump can’t fire Mulvaney because nobody else wants to be his chief of staff: report

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White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney will likely stay on at the White House despite his public confession of a quid pro quo in the Ukraine scandal at the center of the impeachment inquiry, The New York Times reported Friday.

"But Mr. Mulvaney’s job has been anything but normal since the news conference on Thursday at which he seemingly undermined the Trump administration’s strategy for avoiding impeachment by acknowledging that Mr. Trump had sought a quid pro quo for providing Ukraine with American aid," the newspaper reported. "In the chaotic aftermath, the president’s Republican allies are questioning Mr. Mulvaney’s savvy and intelligence even as the Trump campaign is defiantly turning one of his lines from the news conference into a T-shirt."

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