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Undocumented immigrant-turned-lawmaker rips ‘mass deportation’ order: ‘It unleashes the hound dogs’

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Freshman Rep. Adriano Espaillat (D-NY) was the first formerly undocumented immigrant to be elected to Congress. But now, Espaillat is disappointed that the country he once saw as “a country of aspirations” has turned into “a country of deportation.”

“Are we a country of deportation or are we a country of aspirations?” Espaillat asked CNN “New Day” host Alisyn Camerota. “I think that’s what’s on the table right now. Have we changed the course of America? Are we now a heavy-handed, bullying country, or are we a country that anybody could do anything, including an undocumented young boy that’s now a member of Congress.”

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Espaillat was brought by his parents from the Dominican Republic to the United States when he was just nine-years-old. He lived with his grandparents who worked as a seamstress and in a Ray Ban factory in New York, The Daily News reported.

While Espaillat agrees violent criminals who are undocumented should be deported, those who are caught speeding or rounded up through random targeting fall under a different category.

He called living as an undocumented immigrant “chilling,” and talked about the times his grandparents would urge him not to talk to strangers and be cautious of where he went. Under Trump’s executive orders, he said many people living in his district are feeling that same fear he did.

“What I find now is that many people are afraid. I hear in my district office, people calling in concerned. They don’t know how these new guidelines will apply to them,” Espaillat noted. “It unleashes the hound dogs, if you may. It sets fear as a mass deportation guideline that he sets out. You know, it expedites removal. It fractures families.”

You can watch the full video below:

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Israel heads for third election in a year as deadline to form government expires

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Israel is heading for an unprecedented third election within a year after a deadline to create a coalition government ran out at midnight local time on Wednesday and parliament was dissolved.

The prospect of a new election prolongs a political stalemate that has paralysed the government and undermined many citizens' faith in the democratic process.

Initial elections in April were inconclusive and a September re-run of the vote left Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his chief challenger Benny Gantz short of securing the required parliamentary majority to form a government.

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‘Flashback much?’: Senator mocked for saying IG report made him feel like he had ‘dropped acid’

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“About 25 percent of the way through it I thought I dropped acid. It’s surreal.”

A prominent Republican Senator is getting his own special due process on social media after using his precious time to question U.S. Dept. of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz by saying reading the 434 page report on the FBI's Russia investigation was like dropping acid.

U.S. Senator John Kennedy (R-LA) admitted to Horowitz on Wednesday that he had not finished reading the lengthy document but was about 70 percent done. He also appeared to be trying to make the infractions about FISA warrants committed by FBI agents to be seen as unprecedented and historically offensive, in an attempt to serve President Donald Trump by damaging the reputation of the FBI.

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Republicans are leaning towards a short impeachment trial in the Senate with no witnesses: report

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According to an exclusive report from Bloomberg, Senate Republicans are saying there's a growing "early consensus" that a short impeachment trial that could see the GOP-led chamber "vote on a likely acquittal of President Donald Trump without hearing from any witnesses" is the way to go.

"Senator Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican, said a growing number of the Senate’s 53 GOP members want to simply let House Democrats make their case to impeach the president and then hear a rebuttal from Trump’s team before moving immediately to a vote on the articles of impeachment," Bloomberg's Laura Litvan and Steven T. Dennis report.

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