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Robert Reich’s latest warning should make Republicans think long and hard about repealing Obamacare

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- Commentary

On Monday, the Congressional Budget Office predicted that a whopping 14 million people will be left uninsured next year if the GOP’s new health care bill passes. To the surprise of no one, the Trump administration has responded by sticking its collective fingers in its ears.

“It’s just not believable, is what we would suggest,” Heath and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said, a sentiment echoed by former Trump campaign economic adviser Stephen Moore later that day.

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“I don’t believe this report,” Moore told Anderson Cooper in an interview on CNN’s AC 360.

“I think it’s hocus-pocus,” he added, insisting the GOP’s multi-step process will “provide more competition and will make it more economical for people to buy insurance” long-term.

Count Labor Secretary Robert Reich among the report’s many believers.

“Donald Trump said over and over again during the campaign, and he said again after he was president, that nobody would lose coverage,” Reich recalled. “Well, here you have the Congressional Budget Office, whose director was appointed by the Republican Congress, saying in effect that you’ve got huge losses.”

According to the report, that 14 million figure is set to nearly double over the course of a decade. Republicans, Reich explained, should proceed cautiously.

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“If I were a Republican—a member of Congress right now—I would be worried that possibly this bill could be enacted because then I’d have to run for Congress again, I’d have to run for Senate when people were losing their health care and their health insurance and they’re angry about that,” Reich explained.

He’s not falling for the “access to heath care” rhetoric pushed by congressional Republicans like Paul Ryan.

“What kind of choice do you have if you can’t afford it?” Reich asked Cooper. “That’s when the Republicans are using these words like well, ‘you don’t lose access.’ Of course, you lose access if you don’t have any wherewithal.”

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“Where is the replacement if it wasn’t in the Republican bill?” he hammered. “When are we going to see a replacement if it wasn’t already provided by the House Republicans and it is now being marked up by at least two committees? There is no plan.”

Watch:

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Trump defense team’s two most ‘egregious constitutional claims’ blown up by law professor: They ‘have impeachment exactly backwards’

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Writing for Just Security on Friday, Frank O. Bowman III, a legal expert and professor at the University of Missouri School of Law, detailed two of the “more egregious constitutional claims” put forth by Donald Trump’s impeachment defense team in a trial brief filed last week.

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‘Stop lying’: Experts and observers discredit Trump attorney’s impeachment defense with readily available facts

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After three days of House impeachment managers’ brilliant prosecution of President Donald Trump – and “prebuttal” of the arguments the president’s team was expected to make – White House attorneys Saturday morning began their defense of President Trump.

It’s not going well.

Deputy White House Counsel Mike Purpura (photo) has been making the majority of today’s arguments – they have decided that not enough people will be watching on TV so Saturday’s defense will last not eight but just two hours.

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Nancy Pelosi missed a big opportunity in impeachment — but she still has time to fix it

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has her reasons for limiting her impeachment articles to offenses stemming from the abuses and violations related to Ukraine. Unfortunately, she declined to pursue a broader impeachment approach that recognizes multiple provable, serious violations of the Constitution. Speaker Pelosi overruled Chairs of Committees, including the Judiciary Committee, and other senior lawmakers who wanted to forward to the Senate a broader array of impeachable offenses.

Having lost four of the last five House elections to the worst Republican Party in history, Speaker Pelosi remains cautious. She is overly worried about the conservative Democrats who won congressional seats in 2018 in Republican, pro-Trump districts. Endangering their seats might, Pelosi fears, lead to the loss of the House in 2020 and, more immediately, risk not having the votes in the House to pass additional impeachable offenses.

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