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Rape survivors will go to jail if they refuse to testify in Louisiana: District attorney

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Survivors of sexual assault are often in shock or suffering from trauma, but one Louisiana District Attorney couldn’t possibly care less if it leads to a conviction.

Democrat Leon Cannizzaro explained to WWL radio that sometimes a crime victim needs to be put in jail so that he can get the criminal.

“If I have to put a victim of a crime in jail for eight days in order to keep the rapist off of the street for a period years, and prevent him from raping or harming someone else, I’m going to do that,” he said. Though he didn’t explain how he’ll get the survivor to testify against the accused.

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Cannizzaro isn’t the only one. District Attorney Devon Anderson in Houston did the same thing last year. The girl ran from the courtroom and stood in traffic in an apparent suicide attempt.

A new study from Court Watch NOLA disputes the effectiveness of the tactic, arguing that DAs that implement this policy aren’t taking into account the trauma of a sexual assault or domestic violence survivor.

Cannizzaro said the study is “sloppy,” The New Orleans Advocate quoted, because the number of victims that were women wasn’t accurate. Court Watch NOLA corrected the number.

Of the six people arrested on witness warrants, only one was issued for a survivor of a sex crime or domestic violence case.

Cannizzaro said it was a “small price to pay.”

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RAINN, the organization that runs the largest sexual assault hotline, explained: “out of every 1000 instances of rape, only 13 cases get referred to a prosecutor, and only 7 cases will lead to a felony conviction.” Many women don’t report rape because they fear that they won’t be believed, SELF reported. In other cases, a survivor might believe that it is his or her fault or that it makes her “damaged goods.” Others are fearful of being judged for something they feel wasn’t their fault, SELF continued.


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Boeing is no longer manufacturing airplanes after closing its last factory ‘until further notice’: report

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Boeing announced Monday it is suspending production of its 787 Dreamliner aircraft "until further notice" due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on workers and suppliers.

Shuttering the South Carolina plant on Wednesday halts production at the last of the aviation giant's US commercial aircraft facilities.

Boeing, which employs more than 161,000 people, the vast majority in the United States, already suspended activity indefinitely at its factories in Washington state.

The company had been struggling with the grounding of its 737 MAX aircraft after two deadly crashes when the COVID-19 outbreak hit, halting most air travel worldwide and leading some airlines to cancel orders for new aircraft.

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Trump is ‘unethical and tyrannical’ for firing inspector general who relayed Ukraine complaint: Conservative columnist

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On Monday, writing for the Washington Examiner, conservative columnist Quin Hillyer laid into President Donald Trump for getting rid of intelligence community inspector general Michael Atkinson.

Hillyer pointed out that the GOP and some Democrats "rightly expressed outrage" when President Barack Obama fired Gerald Walpin, the AmeriCorps inspector general who Obama had claimed was "confused and disoriented" in meetings and took unauthorized absences from work. But "Trump has even less reason to fire Atkinson now than Obama had to fire Walpin then."

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Trump admits he hasn’t read Capt. Brett Crozier’s letter — but is angry about it anyway

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At President Donald Trump's Monday press briefing for the coronavirus task force, he claimed that he was angry about Navy Capt. Brett Crozier's leaked letter warning of COVID-19 spreading throughout the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt — but admitted he hadn't even read what was in it.

"I think it was five pages long, single-spaced," Trump said. "That's a lot of words!" He also said that it was bad how many copies of the letter he had made — "I think 28."

As he had earlier in the press conference, Trump was more evasive about whether he agreed with acting Navy Secretary's Thomas Modly's decision to relieve Crozier of command of the vessel, saying that he would have to discuss it with Modly.

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