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Ukraine ‘Black ledger’ that forced Manafort out of Trump campaign exists — and he was paid at least $1.2M

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Paul Manafort was paid at least $1.2 million from a so-called “black ledger” used by a pro-Russian political party in Ukraine to make off-the-book payments, according to newly revealed documents.

The Associated Press obtained handwritten financial records that appear to confirm the existence of the ledger, which Manafort claimed was fabricated, and that his consulting firm was paid through it.

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The documents show payments made in 2007 and 2009 — years before Manafort served as Trump’s unpaid campaign chairman — but could be helpful to investigators in both the U.S. and Ukraine.

Ukrainian investigators said the evidence points to a larger pattern of corruption under the country’s pro-Kremlin former president, Viktor Yanukovych.

Federal prosecutors in the U.S. are investigating Manafort’s work in Eastern Europe as part of an anti-corruption case.

Manafort is also under congressional and FBI investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

He did not deny that his consulting firm received the wire transactions, but he said they were “legitimate payments for political consulting work that was provided.”

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Manafort and his spokesman, Jason Maloni, had previously claimed the ledger did not exist.

A Ukrainian lawmaker has accused Manafort of money laundering, and U.S. authorities have investigated his financial dealings with banks in Cyprus — a haven for Russian money laundering.

Manafort resigned from the Trump campaign in August, after the Times reported the ledger.

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The AP reported last month that Manafort was paid millions of dollars by a Russian oligarch starting in 2005 for a secret plan to push pro-Putin propaganda in U.S. media.


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‘This is a lie’: Lisa Page pummels Trump for telling blatant falsehoods about her at crazed rally

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Former FBI attorney Lisa Page on Wednesday called out President Donald Trump for once again lying about her at one of his political rallies.

On Tuesday night, Trump told supporters in Pennsylvania that Page supposedly had to file a restraining order against former FBI agent Peter Strzok, with whom she'd had a relationship during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Trump hedged his claim by telling his supporters, "That's what I heard, I don't know if it's true."

Page, however, took to Twitter to shred the president for repeating a blatant falsehood.

"This is a lie," she wrote. "Nothing like this ever happened. I wish we had a president who knew how to act like one."

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Trump busted for lying about NATO in days-late response to world leaders mocking him

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President Donald Trump responded to a week-old tweet from a Fox Business personality about Canada's prime minister and other world leaders mocking him, and spouted misleading claims about NATO allies.

The president falsely claimed in his response to Charles Payne that Justin Trudeau, along with French president Emmanuel Macron and British prime minister Boris Johnson, were actually angry and not laughing about his bizarre news conference at the NATO summit.

"They were just upset that I demanded they pay their fair share for NATO," Trump claimed, four days after Payne's tweet. "Their countries are delinquent. I raised $530 Billion more from NATO countries! Thank you Charles."

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Fox News has always been bad — but this week shows it’s willing to destroy democracy for Trump

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Fox News has been detrimental to democracy all along, but one journalist and historian believes it's gone fully off the rails this year and become a threat to national security.

Talk show host Stephen Colbert has been mocking the conservative network's commitment to "truthiness" for nearly 15 years, but 2019 has seen Fox News push out Russian disinformation campaigns and attack democracy itself to defend President Donald Trump from impeachment, reported Garrett Graff for Wired.

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