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‘He got me hook, line and sinker’: Trump voters struggling with opioid crisis realize they were duped

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Boyfriend and girlfriend shooting up with heroin syringe (Shutterstock)

An upstate New York man who sold many of his possessions last year to fund a months-long tour playing music at Trump rallies now regrets his vote for the Republican candidate.

“I had everything riding on the fact that he was going to make things better,” Kraig Moss told the Associated Press. “He lied to me.”

Then-candidate Donald Trump looked Moss in the eye at one rally in Iowa and told the grieving father he would help end the drug epidemic that had claimed his 24-year-old son, whose ashes accompanied the truck driver to 45 rallies.

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“He promised me, in honor of my son, that he was going to combat the ongoing heroin epidemic,” Moss said. “He got me hook, line and sinker.”

Post-election analyses found that Trump over-performed in Rust Belt counties ravaged by public health crises — such as drug and alcohol addiction and suicide — but the president’s budget released this week slashes funding for addiction treatment, research and prevention.

Medicaid funding would shrivel under Trump’s 10-year plan, which could devastate coverage to an estimated three in 10 adults addicted to opioids.

Although Congress is unlikely to approve Trump’s budget as written, the GOP-led House passed a health care bill that would dramatically reduce Medicaid coverage and let states weaken requirements for covering addiction treatment.

Patient costs for substance abuse services could jump by thousands of dollars a year in those states, according to a new analysis by the Congressional Budget Office.

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Trump promised during the campaign and after his election to help families suffering from the opioid epidemic — but his voters feel betrayed by the president’s focus on tax cuts, military spending and border security.

“I didn’t see this coming,” said Paul Kusiak, of Massachusetts, who told Trump the candidate about his sons’ successful battles with addiction. “I’m trying desperately to have hope and take the president at his word.”

Trump told voters about his own father’s struggle with alcoholism, and they trusted he would help their own families.

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“I believed that he had learned something new and was going to do something about it,” said Patty McCarthy Metcalf, who leads the advocacy group Faces and Voices of Recovery. “He’s let us down.”

Trump has asked New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to lead a task force on opioid addiction, under the direction of his son-in-law and White House adviser Jared Kushner, but his budget and other proposed cuts has worried many supporters.

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“Inside I’m screaming,” said Sandra Chavez, of Sacramento, whose son died from an infection related to drug use. “We’re going backward with Donald Trump’s plan.”

Trump has proposed cutting funds for addiction research, prevention programs, drug courts and prescription drug monitoring, as well as eliminating support for training of addiction professional.

Justin Butler, a 36-year-old Trump voter from Cleveland, fears he will be back on the streets, using drugs and selling them, if Medicaid stops paying for addiction treatment.

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“He’s turning his back on people,” Butler said. “He’s a liar.”


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Doctors urge CDC to admit side effects from COVID vaccine won’t be ‘a walk in the park’

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Doctors are urging the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to be upfront with the American public about side effects from a potential COVID-19 vaccine.

According to CNBC, the doctors are worried that people will refuse a second dose of the vaccine after experiencing the side effects. Vaccines being produced by both Pfizer and Moderna require two doses.

“We really need to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park,” Dr. Sandra Fryhofer of the American Medical Association told CNBC. “They are going to know they had a vaccine. They are probably not going to feel wonderful. But they’ve got to come back for that second dose.”

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2020 Election

Trump supporter accused of voter fraud invited to apply for a pardon — in gratitude for proving ‘how hard voter fraud is’

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On Wednesday, writing on Twitter, Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman invited a Trump supporter accused of voter fraud to apply for a pardon if convicted — in thanks for showing Pennsylvania voters, and Republicans around the country, how difficult it is to commit voter fraud.

The case centers on a man in Forty Fort, Luzerne County, who allegedly filled out an absentee ballot application for his deceased mother with the intention of casting a second ballot for President Donald Trump, in her name. He faces up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.

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2020 Election

Georgia GOP secretary of state: Trump ‘threw my family under the bus’ even though we voted for him

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Brad Raffensperger, the Republican secretary of state in Georgia, has written an angry editorial for USA Today in which he details the harassment he and his family have been subjected to because he followed the law and certified President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Raffensperger starts out his editorial by praising the Peach State for holding a free and fair election under difficult circumstances stemming from the novel coronavirus pandemic.

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