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Rex Tillerson out of touch with the White House: ‘Calls aren’t getting returned — that kind of crap’

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White House officials have complained they can’t get through to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, whose chief of staff has closed off access to her boss.

The former Exxon Mobil chief executive has frustrated White House officials by surrounding himself with a tight circle of aides, led by his chief of staff, reported the Washington Post.

State Department chief of staff Margaret Peterlin has built a barrier around Tillerson, some Trump aides told the newspaper, and put herself — “and only her,” one administration official sniffed — at the center of information and decision making in the diplomatic agency.

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Peterlin has been limiting access to Tillerson, one outside adviser told the newspaper, which has forced White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and other top officials to “sneak around” or call the secretary of state on his cell phone.

“It is stove-piped,” one senior administration official said. “Calls aren’t getting returned. It’s that kind of crap.”

Some Trump administration officials believe Peterlin has taken too much of a role in hiring state department personnel, although State Department aides dismissed the complaints as sour grapes over political appointees.

Tillerson likes to interview two candidates for most department jobs, the newspaper reported, and he won’t hire an inexperienced candidate simply because they worked as a Trump campaign operative.

“A desire for political patronage does not help a candidate overcome a lack of competence,” said senior State Department aide R.C. Hammond.

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The White House has picked candidates for about a dozen ambassadorships, but the State Department hasn’t acted on the recommendations or even commented on them.

“Not a word back from State,” one adviser said.

Peterlin declined to comment, but Hammond said she’s simply doing her job — which is acting on Tillerson’s orders.

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“She is the chief of staff,” Hammond said. “Her job is to implement what the secretary wants her to do. She leads the staff to be the implementers of what the secretary wants to get done. Margaret doesn’t freelance.”

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Why saying ‘OK boomer’ at work is considered age discrimination – but millennial put-downs aren’t

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The phrase “OK boomer” has become a catch-all put-down that Generation Zers and young millennials have been using to dismiss retrograde arguments made by baby boomers, the generation of Americans who are currently 55 to 73 years old.

Though it originated online and primarily is fueling memes, Twitter feuds and a flurry of commentary, it has begun migrating to real life. Earlier this month, a New Zealand lawmaker lobbed the insult at an older legislator who had dismissed her argument about climate change.

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Republicans are getting scared about Gordon Sondland’s Wednesday impeachment testimony: report

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Ambassador Gordon Sondland may be the most dangerous witness for President Donald Trump in the impeachment hearings so far, and that's in part because he has a lot to lose.

And according to CNN's Shimon Prokuecz, his scheduled testimony for Wednesday morning is making Republicans nervous:

Multiple GOP sources say they are most worried about what Gordon Sondland will do tomorrow - and whether he will turn on the President. The fear, Republicans say, is that he could undercut the last GOP defense. @mkraju

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‘There is no managing Donald Trump’: White House Republicans blasted for their myth of ‘adults in the room’

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Republicans who thought they could manage Donald Trump were taken down in The New Yorker on Tuesday.

The Susan Glasser article was titled, "The spectacular failure of the Trump wranglers."

"On Tuesday, nearly seven hours into the marathon third day of public impeachment hearings, Kurt Volker tried to explain to the House Intelligence Committee what it was like to carry out the nearly impossible task of wrangling U.S. policy toward Ukraine during the Presidency of Donald Trump," Glasser wrote. "Volker, a veteran Republican diplomat who had been serving, since 2017, as Trump’s Special Representative to Ukraine, said that he realized last spring that he had a 'problem,' and that it was Trump himself.

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