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WATCH: Buzz Aldrin floored as Trump humiliates himself attempting to talk about science and space

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Former Astronaut Buzz Aldrin (Photo: Screen capture)

In an event at the White House this week, President Donald Trump reignited The National Space Council to help achieve his dream of landing a human on Mars within his first term.

The problem was not in reigniting the American strive to achieve planetary travel or even Trump’s inability to understand Buzz Aldrin’s “Toy Story” quote during his speech. The concern many found was that the president seemed to misunderstand what exactly “space” was.

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“At some point in the future, we’re going to look back and say how did we do it without space?” Trump asked, as if “space” was one of the scientists on the team.

Aldrin’s response was obvious and captured on camera.

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Reading from his speech, Trump had a poignant comment about “discovery” and a journey that “will not only make us stronger and more prosperous but will unite us behind grand ambitions and bring us all closer together.” But the moment was short-lived as Trump ad libbed, “Wouldn’t that be nice? Can you believe that space is going to do that?”

Trump then sat down at the table to sign the executive order. “I know what this is. Space!” he announced, enthusiastically.

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Aldrin again seemed uncomfortable. “To infinity and beyond!” he joked, and those at the event chuckled.

Trump missed the joke.

“This is infinity here. It could be infinity. We don’t really don’t know. But it could be. It has to be something — but it could be infinity, right?” he said and signed the order.

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Cops violated Breonna Taylor’s civil rights before they even knocked down her door: Legal expert

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A legal expert explained that Breonna Taylor's civil rights were violated before Louisville police showed up at her apartment to serve a search warrant.

Civil rights attorney Maya Wiley told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" the system that let police off the hook in Taylor's killing was inherently rigged against people of color, because it shields officers from accountability when they make mistakes.

"Remember [this] started as a no-knock warrant, and because she had no criminal record, because there were real questions here, they actually changed it to a knock-and-announce [warrant], that tells you something," Wiley said. "It also tells us we need to know more because, as I said, there were indications the Postal Service inspector said they didn't think there were suspicious packages, so there is a need to understand more."

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2020 Election

Trump made an ‘implicit threat of violence’ when he refused to say he’d leave peacefully: CNN’s Berman

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CNN's John Berman on Thursday accused President Donald Trump of implicitly threatening the use of violence if he loses the 2020 presidential election.

While discussing Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transition of power should he lose the 2020 election, Berman said that this was the kind of thing he'd expect to hear from leaders in foreign countries without long traditions of upholding democracy.

"To be clear, the refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer in and of itself is an implicit threat of violence," he said.

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2020 Election

Here’s how Trump intends to create ‘chaos and deadlock’ to steal the election from voters

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The author of a new piece outlining how President Donald Trump could steal the election from voters explained just how that might happen.

The Atlantic's Barton Gellman revealed the Trump campaign is exploring a strategy to pressure Republican-led state legislatures to appoint electors, instead of letting voters choose, and he told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" how that would work in practice.

"The only other time in history we had a debacle like this with possibility of the multiple competing slates of electors where two groups of people said, 'I'm the state elector for the state of Pennsylvania,' for example, it's supposed to go to Congress," Gellman said. "Congress is supposed to decide who are the legitimate electors, if any, from the state, and the problem is the electorate count act is one of the most garbled statutes ever passed by Congress, which is saying a lot."

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