Quantcast
Connect with us

For the first time in history you’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse live from balloons

Published

on

Next week’s solar eclipse will be streamed live online for the first time, from the vantage point of helium-filled balloons across the United States, providing the public with sky-high views as the moon blocks the sun.

A team of researchers from Montana State University has partnered with NASA to participate in the Space Grant Ballooning Project to send more than 50 high-altitude balloons 80,000 feet (24,384 meters) up to capture the solar eclipse as it crosses the country on Aug. 21.

“We’ll see the variations from coast to coast to see what the eclipse does over landscapes,” Cassandra Runyon, director of the South Carolina Space Grant Consortium, said excitedly at a test launch on Thursday.

During the eclipse, the moon will pass between the sun and Earth from west to east, and cast a shadow on Earth.

On the east coast of Charleston, South Carolina, the last location in the continental United States over which the eclipse will pass, Runyon and her team of professors and students will launch balloons from a U.S. Coast Guard boat five to six nautical miles (9 km to 11 km) offshore.

ADVERTISEMENT

The eclipse shadow was expected to move at 2,000 miles per hour in Oregon and slow down to 1,500 miles per hour in South Carolina, Runyon said.

The latex balloons, which are roughly 9 feet (2.7 m) tall when filled with helium, will be equipped with high-definition video cameras, still cameras and computers. They will be launched from roughly 50 U.S. locations and transmit the images back to Earth.

The balloons will be filled with enough helium to lift them roughly 1,000 feet per minute reaching an altitude of 80,000 feet.

ADVERTISEMENT

Using a ground station antenna, team members on land will live stream the video online at https://stream.live/.

“I think it’s very powerful to have that off-the-earth perspective,” said Angela des Jardins, director of the Montana Space Grant Consortium at the Montana State University.

Des Jardins said this will be the first time that a solar eclipse will be streamed live online.

ADVERTISEMENT

The project will allow scientists to study the sun’s corona and the lunar orbit, providing practical experience for students and making this major scientific event accessible to the public, des Jardins said.

The Aug. 21 event marks the first total solar eclipse visible anywhere in the lower 48 states since 1979.

(Editing by Marcy Nicholson)


Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump’s tax law threatened TurboTax’s profits — so the company started charging the disabled, the unemployed and students

Published

on

The 2017 tax overhaul vastly expanded the number of people who could file simplified tax returns, a boon to millions of Americans.

But the new law directly threatened the lucrative business of Intuit, the maker of TurboTax.

Although the company draws in customers with the promise of a “free” product, its fortunes depend on getting as many customers as possible to pay. It had been regularly charging $100 or more for returns that included itemized deductions for mortgage interest and charitable donations. Under the new law, many wealthier taxpayers would no longer be filing that form, qualifying them to use the company’s free software.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s packed Supreme Court backs ‘forced arbitration’ that bars workers from taking abusive bosses to court

Published

on

Corporations are rapidly rendering sexual harassment, race and gender discrimination, life-threatening workplaces and wage theft immune to employee legal action.

They achieve this by forcing the vast majority of non-union private-sector workers to sign away their rights to go to court or use class or collective arbitration. Instead many millions of workers are being forced to forgo these efficient legal ways to resolve issues and to file individual arbitration claims.

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute and the Center for Popular Democracy says that by 2024 more than 80% of non-union private-sector workers will find courthouse doors chained shut by forced arbitration clauses that ban lawsuits and collective actions. (EPI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank created in 1986 to press the needs of low- and middle-income workers in economic policy discussions.)

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Corporations can legally put carcinogens in our food without warning labels — here’s why

Published

on

A recent study by the Environmental Working Group revealed something horrifying: Glyphosate, the active ingredient in the popular weedkiller Roundup, was present in 17 of the 21 oat-based cereal and snack products at levels considered unsafe for children. That includes six different brands of Cheerios, one of the most popular American cereals.

I've written before about the limits of corporate free speech when it comes to public safety, but on that occasion I discussed this insofar as it involved corporate-sponsored climate change denialism. Yet here we have something more tangible, more direct: The safe glyphosate limit for children is 160 parts per billion (ppb), yet Honey Nut Cheerios Medley Crunch has 833 parts per billion and regular Cheerios has 729 ppb. While the potential risks of glyphosate are fiercely debated, many scientists believe that it is linked to cancer.

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

close-image