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Military leaders ‘despondent’ over Trump’s defense of white supremacists — but are too afraid to quit

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Military leaders reportedly despaired at President Donald Trump’s equivocal defense of white supremacists who killed a protester during a Virginia rally.

Chief of staff John Kelly, a retired general, and other top administration officials were “despondent” over the president’s insistence that “many sides” were to blame for the violence that erupted when white supremacists marched in support of Confederate monuments, reported Vanity Fair.

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The president insisted some “very fine people” had marched alongside neo-Nazis in Charlottesville, and expressed his own support for the Confederate monuments they were rallying to preserve.

Kelly “could only look at the floor and shake his head as he listened,” according to the magazine’s reporting.

One source told Vanity Fair that Kelly and other military leaders in the Cabinet felt duty-bound to remain in the administration, despite the president’s remarks, in order to carry out essential government business.

That includes developing a strategy to deal with worsening tension with North Korea, according to the source.

Other top administration officials, including chief economic adviser Gary Cohn and Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump, were also upset by Trump’s seeming defense of neo-Nazis and white supremacists who chanted anti-Semitic slogans.

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His daughter, who converted to Orthodox Judaism before marrying Kushner, tweeted out a response the following day but has remained silent since, as her husband has.

“There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-nazis,” she tweeted.

Defense Secretary James Mattis addressed troops serving in Jordan, asking them to remain steadfast despite the political divisions back home — which many believe refers to the president’s comments on his white supremacist supporters.

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“Our country right now, it’s got problems — you know it and I know it — it’s got problems we don’t have in the military,” Mattis said. “You just hold the line, my fine young soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines, you hold the line until our country gets back to understanding and respecting each other and showing it — to be friendly with one another.”


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COVID-19 obituary blames Republicans for Texas man’s untimely end: ‘They blame his death on Trump’

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One family in Texas recently used their loved one’s obituary to criticize President Donald Trump and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott for allowing “needless” COVID-19 deaths.

David W. Nagy died alone in a hospital bed, leaving behind his "inconsolable wife."

"He suffered greatly from the ravages of the COVID-19 virus and the separation from his much loved family who were not allowed at his bedside," the obituary says.

"Family members believe David's death was needless," the obituary continues. "They blame his death and the deaths of all of the other innocent people, on Trump, Abbott and all the other politicians who did not take this pandemic seriously and were more concerned with their popularity and votes than lives."

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Pennsylvania teen issues violent threat to defend friend from racism accusation: ‘I can show you what a real hate crime is’

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A Pennsylvania man was charged with making terroristic threats after a Black teenager accused his friend of being racist.

A friend of Andrew Smith, of Chalfont, attacked a Central Bucks West High School student by name and used racial slurs, reported the Bucks County Courier Times.

Smith's friend, who has not been charged, lashed out at the teen for supporting the Black Lives Matter movement and said her views “make me wanna commit a black hate crime,” according to The Philadelphia Inquirer.

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2020 Election

Trump’s strategy isn’t working in Pennsylvania — a state the president can’t afford to lose: report

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Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and Ohio are the four states that GOP strategists have been describing as President Donald Trump’s “Rust Belt firewall” — states that went to President Barack Obama in both 2008 and 2012 but favored Trump over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016. But that “firewall” has not been holding up for the president. Trump’s reelection campaign has "temporarily" suspended its advertising in Michigan, although it continues to advertise in the other three — all of which are clearly in play for former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive 2020 Democratic presidential nominee. And Philadelphia-based reporter Holly Otterbein, in an article published in Politico on August 2, stresses that so far, Trump’s attacks on Biden have not been resonating in Pennsylvania.

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