Quantcast
Connect with us

‘We lied all the time’: Ex-skinhead explains how ‘alt-right’ white supremacists trick their followers

Published

on

A former white supremacist cautioned that there’s no real difference between the racist ideology he once embraced and the so-called “alt-right” or white nationalist movements.

Christian Picciolini, a former skinhead who now leads the nonprofit Life After Hate organization, said white supremacists have tried for years to obscure their racist intentions to help broaden their appeal, reported Business Insider.

ADVERTISEMENT

Picciolini was recruited into Chicago Area Skin Heads in 1987, at 14, and became the neo-Nazi group’s leader two years later — and he recognizes the tactics employed by white nationalists like Richard Spencer to rebrand their hateful ideology.

“We recognized back then that we were turning away the average American white racists and that we needed to look and speak more like our neighbors,” Picciolini said. “The idea we had was to blend in, normalize, make the message more palatable.”

The former neo-Nazi, who left the hate group in 1996 and works to get others out now, told Business Insider that white supremacist ideas about the “Jewish media” and “Jewish global conspiracy” showed up in last year’s election — but reframed as the “liberal media” and “globalism.”

Website like Breitbart News — run by former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon — push those tropes into the political mainstream.

ADVERTISEMENT

Picciolini said many followers of the “alt-right” movement don’t realize they’re being recruited into white supremacy for one simple reason: hate groups lie.

“We lied all the time,” Picciolini told Business Insider. “To the media, we weren’t a hate organization — we were a pro-white organization. We felt that our white pride was being taken away. It was all spin. Behind closed doors, it was all about supremacy and power and eliminating people that weren’t like us.”

White supremacists are bleeding into other right-wing extremist movements during the Donald Trump presidency, according to experts.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Not everyone in the alt-right is a overt white nationalist,” said J.M. Berger, who studies far-right extremism at the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism. “But white nationalism is definitely the movement’s center of gravity, and the term originated with an explicitly white nationalist website.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Morrison in the USA sucking up to Trump’: Aussies furious to see prime minister campaigning for Trump

Published

on

President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison appeared at a rally in Ohio Sunday, prompting Aussies to complain that it's unacceptable for their leader to be campaigning for Trump.

Trump invited himself to a Houston, Texas rally with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, where he tried to campaign for the U.S. president with Indian-American voters. Sadly, however, nearly 80 percent of Indian-American voters cast their ballots for Hillary Clinton in 2016.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Republicans love the Constitution — until it applies to them: Conservative columnist

Published

on

Conservative Washington Post columnist Max Boot unleashed on President Donald Trump's latest scandal he's calling Ukraine-gate. But when it comes to Republicans, he called them outright complicit.

In his Sunday column, Boot noted that a mob boss doesn't have to overtly say “pay up, or we will destroy your store” to be guilty of extortion. In Trump's case, he tends to say things in a way that it is understood what he wants people to do, according to former "fixer" Michael Cohen.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Hate for Trump sets new record of Americans who can’t stand a president

Published

on

A new poll shows a record number of Americans can't stand the president of the United States.

According to the most recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal public opinion poll, an astounding 69 percent of Americans don't like Trump personally.

During the early 2000s, President George W. Bush enjoyed the benefit of Americans finding him likable and wanting to "have a beer" with the sober leader. That measure of "likability" has been a kind of inspiration for political leaders searching for voters based not on issues but on personality.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Investigate and Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image