Quantcast
Connect with us

Bay Area Tesla plant hit with charges of racist supervisors using the N-word and sharing ‘pickaninny’ pictures

Published

on

The Tesla auto plant in Alameda County has been hit with a lawsuit filed by three former black employees saying there were subjected to racial harassment while working there.

According to KNTV,  the lawsuit was filed on Monday, with the ex-employees saying they were routinely called the N-word, and one saying he was told to “go back to Africa.”

Ex-employee Owen Diaz claims he was subjected to ethnic slurs shortly after starting at the factory, and found racist drawings of African Americans left around the plant, including some that depicted “pickaninnys” — an old time slur of black children.

ADVERTISEMENT

According to Diaz, he was visiting with his 19-year-old son –who also worked at the plant — when they were insulted by a supervisor.

“I was turning the corner, I was coming out to give my son his lunch, and his supervisor started calling him a [expletive] [n-word],” he said.

Diaz said he complained to the staffing company that placed him in the plant before sending an email to his Tesla supervisor, saying he didn’t feel safe around the abusive employee —  but he received no answer.

His son Demetric was let go a few months after he started and Owen quit after less than a year on the job, saying, “I couldn’t take it anymore.”

According to the report, this is not the first time the car plant has been accused of allowing racial harassment.

ADVERTISEMENT

In March, a production employee filed a lawsuit against Tesla, alleging the company failed to protect him from ongoing racial harassment, while providing video of co-workers calling him the N-word and threatening to cut him up.

Watch the video below via KNTV:

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

At Joe Biden’s eleventh-hour rally in Nevada, many union members remain uncommitted

Published

on

On the eve of the Nevada caucuses, former Vice President Joe Biden, who has referred to himself as "middle-class Joe," had a last-minute chance to connect with middle-class Nevada voters before Saturday's caucuses. At a barbecue with burgers, hot dogs, and ice cream sandwiches, attendees that included firefighters and iron workers gathered for what was advertised as a precinct captain training — or to simply hear Biden's pitch. Indeed, many attendees of the barbecue were still undecided a mere day before caucusing.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s NSC is ignoring intelligence reports and basing policy on handouts of Trump’s tweets: report

Published

on

According to a report from the New York Times, members of the National Security Council under Donald Trump no longer uses their extensive knowledge of international relations, politics, and history to formulate foreign policy security proposals for the president's review -- and are instead using the president's tweets to make policy based upon his desires and social media proclamations.

The report begins with noting that council members are often handed printouts of the president's tweets when they convene and are expected to use his words as their guide to formulate proposals that will likely find favor with the president.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Wells Fargo to pay $3 billion to settle fake accounts scandal

Published

on

Wells Fargo has agreed to pay US regulators $3 billion to settle three investigations into the bank's damaging fake accounts scandal, the Department of Justice said on Friday.

The fine settles criminal and civil liability in the case in which the nation's fourth largest bank between 2002 and 2016 pressured employees to meet unrealistic sales goals that led to creating millions of accounts or credit cards without consent.

Wells Fargo admitted it collected millions of dollars in fees and interest, harmed the credit ratings of certain customers, and misused personal information, the Justice Department said in a statement.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image