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Congressman Jared Huffman comes out as a non-believer — and rips Trump’s phony religious pandering

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Rep. Jared Huffman, D-CA (Official portrait)

A Democratic congressman from California says there’s “too much religion” in U.S. politics and that too many politicians — Republicans in particular — use religion as a cudgel, including President Donald Trump.

In an interview with The Washington Post, Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA) said that he is going public with his personal stance against “religious tests” and the idea that lawmakers must be religious to appeal to constituents.

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The 53-year-old congressman said that for years he has left questionnaires about his religious beliefs blank or written “none of your business” on them. He’s one of only nine members of the current Congress who left their “spiritual profiles” blank.

“I don’t believe in religious tests, and I don’t believe my religion is all that important to the people I represent,” Huffman told the Post, “and I think there’s too much religion in politics. For those reasons I felt good about not even answering it.”

Huffman said that Pres. Trump and his cabinet members — particularly evangelical Christian Secretary of Education Betsy DeVoswield religion in “negative” ways, using it as a moral pedestal from which they look down on nonbelievers.

“I’ve seen religion wielded in such negative ways around here, lately. Trump does it all the time, so implausibly,” he said.

“Experts on religious identity in Congress say Huffman seems to be only the second member in contemporary records to describe his ethical system as not being God-based. The first was long-serving Democrat Pete Stark, also of Northern California, who made news a decade ago when he came out as an atheist,” wrote the Post‘s Michelle Boorstein.

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“I’m not hostile to religion, and I’m not judging other people’s religious views,” Huffman said.

He identifies as a humanist, he said, because the term “atheist” implies a certainty he is uncomfortable with.

“I suppose you could say I don’t believe in God. The only reason I hesitate is — unlike some humanists, I’m not completely closing the door to spiritual possibilities,” said Huffman. “We all know people who have had experiences they believe are divine…and I’m open to something like that happening.”

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Ivanka Trump wants to be the ‘first female president’ — but there’s one major obstacle

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Ivanka Trump is harboring political ambitions after she leaves the White House after her father's election loss.

It's not clear where President Donald Trump's eldest daughter will live, along with her husband and fellow White House adviser Jared Kushner, but their former friends, colleagues and associates believe Ivanka Trump will try to build up her influence in the Republican Party, reported the Washington Post.

“I think she’d want to be the [first] female president,” said Marissa Velez Kraxberger, a film producer who worked for Ivanka for two years at her now-defunct company. “I don’t think she’s actually ever had any interest in fashion but everything was an angle to gain more power in whatever possible way.”

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2020 Election

GOP senator knows Trump lost but thinks it would be ‘political suicide’ to admit it: report

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Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) is still spouting conspiracy theories about the election being "stolen" from President Donald Trump -- but according to one former Wisconsin Republican official, Johnson understands that Trump lost.

Mark Becker, the former Chairman of the Brown County Republican Party, writes at The Bulwark that he had a conversation with Johnson after the election in which the senator acknowledged Trump's defeat.

However, Johnson said that he was loath to admit it publicly because of the strong support the president had received from Wisconsin GOP voters, despite the fact that the president narrowly lost the state this year.

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‘Dumbest senator ever’: Morning Joe mocks Republican Ron Johnson

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MSNBC's Joe Scarborough mocked Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) for demanding proof of something that doesn't exist.

Attorney General William Barr announced the Department of Justice had found no evidence of voter fraud, as President Donald Trump has claimed, and Johnson called on Barr to "show everybody" the proof that the election had not been stolen.

"The man Guinness Book of World Records has called the dumbest senator to ever be sworn in in this constitutional republic," Scarborough said. "I'm speaking, of course, of Ron Johnson, who said that William Barr must show his evidence that he has no evidence."

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