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Ex-cop said he ‘loved’ seeing neo-Nazi kill people – and police union is fighting to get him back on the force

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A Springfield, Massachusetts police officer took to social media to praise the murder of Heather Heyer at the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, as Raw Story reported in August. Springfield Police Commissioner John Barbieri announced Friday that Conrad Lariviere has been fired, Mass Live reports.

“Hahahaha love this, maybe people shouldn’t block roads,” Conrad Lariviere commented on a news story noting “one dead, 19 injured.”

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After being called out for his insensitive remark, Lariviere identified himself as a cop and said critics of his views, “live in a fantasy land with the rest of America while I deal with the real danger.”

“It was determined that Officer Lariviere impaired the operation of the Springfield Police Department or its employees and discredited the department,’ Commissioner Barbieri explained.

The mayor of Springfield agreed.

“I stand by and agree with Commissioner Barbieri’s decision to fire Officer Conrad Lariviere over his insensitive and uncalled for Facebook remarks,” Mayor Domenic Sarno stated.

The police union, however, took issue with the firing.

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“His point was that such disorderly behavior has serious consequences, and both sides of the dispute bore responsible for the disruptions,” the executive board of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers, Local 364 said in a statement to Mass Live. “While some may find Officer Lariviere’s comments to have been insensitive, we do not believe that they rise to the level of misconduct, and certainly do not warrant termination, even if there was a clear policy involved.”

“We also believe that the subject of the Facebook posting was not a matter of public concern,” the union argued.

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Giuliani associates’ company promised to build a bizarre temple over Jerusalem

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The Wall Street Journal has uncovered new details about the strange work done by Fraud Guarantee, the company founded by Lev Parnas, the indicted henchman of Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Specifically, the Journal was given information from an investor who says he plugged $250,000 into Fraud Guarantee after Parnas told him that he could use his connections with President Donald Trump to help promote his initiative to create peace in the Middle East.

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2020 Election

Liberal PACs gear up for major ad blitz to flip GOP-controlled legislatures in states where Trump is vulnerable

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According to a report from Politico, two left-leaning PAC's are working in concert to flip GOP-majority legislatures in reliably conservative or too- close-to-call states.

With Donald Trump expected to be at the top of the Republican ticket, "Arena and Future Now Fund, are planning to spend $7 million to try to flip GOP-controlled state legislatures in Florida, Arizona, Michigan and North Carolina," the report states.

According to Daniel Squadron, co-founder of the Future Now Fund, "If you look at where the important states are, the places most people are watching are the Electoral College to secure the White House. But the truth is that when you talk about the impact of 2020, electoral control of the state legislatures is critical.”

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Newly revealed letter details Rudy Giuliani’s work for Fraud Guarantee company owned by indicted henchman

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A newly revealed letter sheds light on Rudy Giuliani's work for Fraud Guarantee, a company founded by his indicted associates Lev Parnas and David Correia -- and the document has been handed over to investigators.

Fraud Guarantee circulated an investor letter last year that shows the company would pay the consulting firm Giuliani Partners up to $2 million for the first year and give the former New York City mayor equity in the company, reported the Wall Street Journal.

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