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Mormon parents are pushing back on bishops who interrogate young girls about sex

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A group of Mormon parents is beginning to push back against a longstanding tradition within their church that allows bishops to interrogate children about their sexual habits.

Salt Lake Tribune columnist Peggy Fletcher Stack explains that the “bishop’s interview” process long employed by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is increasingly seen by many parents as unnecessary and invasive of their children’s privacy. The interviews typically involve one-on-one interviews between bishops and children, and the questions asked of the children can get very personal.

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“Some bishops pose pointed questions about moral cleanliness in these conversations, perhaps quizzing about masturbation, heavy petting or fornication, while others keep their queries more general,” she writes.

However, Stack says some parents are challenging this practice, while noting that a recent online petition has gathered more than 6,000 signatures by urging the church to “immediately cease the practice of subjecting children [ages 10 to 17] to questions about masturbation, orgasm, ejaculation, sexual positions or anything else of a sexual nature.”

Julie de Azevedo Hanks, a Salt Lake City therapist and the wife of an LDS bishop, tells Stack that such reforms are long overdue and would make for a more heathly environment for young Mormons.

“[The interview practice] is intrusive, inappropriate and sends a mixed message regarding boundaries around sexual conversation with adult men,” she says. “In no other situation would a parent allow or encourage their minor child to have sexual conversations with an adult.”

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Ukrainians may flip on Trump and stop repeating his talking points: report

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Officials in Ukraine are growing increasingly frustrated with President Donald Trump continuing to prioritize Russia over the American ally, The Daily Beast reported Wednesday.

"People working closely with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky have been in contact with Trump administration officials over the past several weeks discussing the relationship between the two presidents, according to four people with knowledge of the talks. Based on those conversations, Ukrainian officials came to expect that Trump would make a statement of support before Zelensky met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in France for peace talks," The Beast explained. "But as Saturday and Sunday ticked by, there was only silence from the White House. Even as Ukrainian officials have publicly been loath to criticize Trump’s pressure campaign on their country, frustrations with Washington have quietly percolated. And last weekend, they were especially acute."

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Kamala Harris uses IG hearing to connect the dots between Bill Barr and Giuliani’s corrupt schemes

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Sen. Kamala Harris connected the dots between Rudy Giuliani and attempts to prevent the Department of Justice from prosecuting a Ukrainian billionaire.

Harris, who was San Francisco District Attorney and California Attorney General prior to joining the U.S. Senate, put her experience as a career prosecutor to use while questioning DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

"So it was recently reported that the president's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, asked Ukrainians to help search for dirt [on] the political rivals of the president. In exchange for the help, Giuliani offered to help fix criminal cases against them at DOJ," Harris noted.

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Trump admits defeat in effort to entirely eliminate federal agency with 5,500 employees: report

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President Donald Trump has given up on fulfilling another one of his campaign vows as he runs for re-election on a platform of "promises made, promises kept."

"President Trump has abandoned his administration’s faltering effort to dissolve a key federal agency, a major setback in his three-year battle to keep his campaign promise to make government leaner and more efficient," The Washington Post reported Wednesday. "The Office of Personnel Management will remain the human resources manager of the civilian workforce of 2.1 million employees and its functions will not — for the foreseeable future at least — be parceled out to the White House and the General Services Administration."

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