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Mormon parents are pushing back on bishops who interrogate young girls about sex

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A group of Mormon parents is beginning to push back against a longstanding tradition within their church that allows bishops to interrogate children about their sexual habits.

Salt Lake Tribune columnist Peggy Fletcher Stack explains that the “bishop’s interview” process long employed by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is increasingly seen by many parents as unnecessary and invasive of their children’s privacy. The interviews typically involve one-on-one interviews between bishops and children, and the questions asked of the children can get very personal.

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“Some bishops pose pointed questions about moral cleanliness in these conversations, perhaps quizzing about masturbation, heavy petting or fornication, while others keep their queries more general,” she writes.

However, Stack says some parents are challenging this practice, while noting that a recent online petition has gathered more than 6,000 signatures by urging the church to “immediately cease the practice of subjecting children [ages 10 to 17] to questions about masturbation, orgasm, ejaculation, sexual positions or anything else of a sexual nature.”

Julie de Azevedo Hanks, a Salt Lake City therapist and the wife of an LDS bishop, tells Stack that such reforms are long overdue and would make for a more heathly environment for young Mormons.

“[The interview practice] is intrusive, inappropriate and sends a mixed message regarding boundaries around sexual conversation with adult men,” she says. “In no other situation would a parent allow or encourage their minor child to have sexual conversations with an adult.”

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Seth Meyers: You know Trump isn’t the chief law enforcement officer because he couldn’t pass the physical

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"Late Night" host Seth Meyers warned that the United States is sliding into authoritarianism under President Donald Trump.

Sounding the alarm Wednesday evening, Meyers cited reports that Trump was making lists of disloyal people, purging them from their jobs, hiring unqualified cronies in top posts, and claiming he has the right to interfere in criminal cases.

While speaking to the press last week, Trump even announced that he's allowed to be involved in all criminal cases because he's the chief law enforcement officer of the United States. It's actually a title used for the attorney general.

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Conservative columnist nails the infectious diseases the Trump White House is suffering from

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On Wednesday, conservative columnist Max Boot revealed the "diseases" at the heart of President Donald Trump's administration that are weakening their capacity to respond to the very real disease threat from coronavirus.

Simply put: Fevered nationalism, hatred of the civil service, and a pathological desire to erase the legacy of President Barack Obama.

"Covid-19 has already infected more than 80,000 people in 37 countries, causing more than 2,600 deaths, and experts doubt it will slow in the spring," wrote Boot. "That a virus that started in China could have a bad impact on the United States should be no surprise: Diseases don’t respect borders any more than terrorists or trade flows do. Transnational threats require transnational solutions. To cite but one example, many of the medicines and medical supplies that Americans need, including N95 face masks, come from China."

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Trump’s health secretary learned Pence was taking over coronavirus outbreak moments before press conference

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President Donald Trump apparently left Secretary Alex Azar out of the loop on Vice President Mike Pence taking over the coronavirus response.

According to the Washington Post, Azar was "blindsided" by the decision, according to five people familiar with the incident. Azar learned about it moments before the press conference this afternoon.

Pence said that he would run a task force at the Department of Health and Human Services, which Azar is in charge of.

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