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Sen. Mark Warner says he’s seen damning evidence against Trump — but Mueller has much worse

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Sen. Mark Warner (Photo: Flickr)

The ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee suggested he’s seen damning evidence in the investigation of Russian campaign interference — but he hinted special counsel Robert Mueller had even more proof.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) said he’s more convinced than ever that the investigation is crucial to preserving U.S. democracy, according to Axios.

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The Virginia Democrat told the website that, “based on witness testimony and documents that he has seen behind closed doors, the Russia probe is ‘the most important thing I will ever work on.'”

But Warner said the special counsel investigation had likely uncovered even more conclusive evidence linking the Trump campaign to Russian interference.

“I feel that more strongly today than even a year ago, and we don’t even have near the tools that Robert Muller has in his investigation,” Warner said.

This week, Warner warned Trump would be triggering a “constitutional crisis” by having Mueller removed from the investigation, and he expressed concerns about Republican efforts to undermine the special counsel probe.

“Any attempt by this president to remove special counsel Mueller from his position or to pardon key witnesses in any effort to shield them from accountability or shut down the investigation would be a gross abuse of power and a flagrant violation of executive branch responsibilities and authorities,” Warner said in a speech. “These truly are red lines and simply cannot allow them to be crossed.”

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Warner told Axios that the Senate Intelligence Committee plans to pressure Facebook to turn over more social media ads sponsored by Russia during the 2016 campaign.

He also intends to call back Jared Kushner, Donald Trump Jr. and other “principals involved in some of these activities” for more questioning about targeting specific social media users, likely with the help of Cambridge Analytica.

Those key campaign officials were previously interviewed by congressional staffers, but Warner once a chance to question them himself.

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“We could debate whether they come back in public or private,” Warner said. “I would lean more towards public.”

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The tumult following Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death previews things to come

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On Friday evening, just before 7:30 p.m., the U.S. Supreme Court announced that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a pioneer in using the law to advance gender equity, had died from complications due to metastatic pancreatic cancer just six weeks ahead of the presidential election.

The death of Ginsburg, who had battled various forms of cancer over the years, was not altogether surprising.

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Trump knew how bad COVID-19 was in January — but called it ‘good’ because he could avoid shaking ‘disgusting’ voters’ hands: ex-Pence aide

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Olivia Troye, a former White House aide who worked for Vice President Mike Pence's office, is sounding off with more details about the Trump administration's early knowledge about the severity of the coronavirus.

Troye appeared on "The Today Show" on Tuesday where she discussed the weeks leading up to the World Health Organization declaring the coronavirus a global pandemic. Although Pence and President Donald Trump have repeatedly claimed they had no way of knowing how bad the pandemic could be, Troye suggests otherwise, reports The Hill.

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‘Completely shameless’: Pompeo faces backlash for violating his own guidelines on political activity

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President Donald Trump's secretary of state has been increasingly "brazen" about appearing at political events, in apparent violation of his own directive to the department's employees.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wanted to accept the president's invitation last year to speak at a campaign rally, but a congressional aide said he backed down after being told that would violate existing rules, reported Politico.

However, that's all changed this year.

“What he is doing is entirely unconventional,” said Harry Kopp, an author of books on U.S. diplomacy. “The employees of the State Department have, by now, I think, no illusions about the partisan nature of their secretary of state.”

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