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Kellyanne Conway was yanked off cable news after Ivanka Trump grew tired of her ‘idiotic militancy’

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Kellyanne Conway (Photo: Screen capture)

In the early days of the Trump administration, Kellyanne Conway was a ubiquitous presence on cable news shows.

However, in the wake of several high-profile gaffes, Conway’s TV appearances were dramatically cut back — so much so that “Saturday Night Live” even devoted an entire sketch to asking of Conway’s whereabouts.

According to journalist Michael Wolff, it seems that White House staff members wanted Conway yanked off the air because they thought her strident and angry defenses of every single Trump action made the entire White House look ridiculous.

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“Others in the White House… however much the president enjoyed her, found her militancy idiotic,” writes Wolff in The Hollywood Reporter. “Even Ivanka and Jared regarded Conway’s fulsome defenses as cringeworthy.”

Among other things, Conway infamously used the term “alternative facts” to describe the White House’s approach to disseminating information, while also concocting a completely fictional terrorist attack in Bowling Green, Kentucky to justify the president’s ban on travel from multiple Muslim-majority countries.


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Expert explains why ‘systemic conservatism’ continues to prevail in America

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On the Sunday after the November 3rd presidential election, Utah Senator Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential candidate, congratulated President-elect Joe Biden but insisted that the overall election was an endorsement of conservative principles. He pointed to the gains Republicans made in the House, though they are still in the minority, and the failure of the Democrats to capture control of the Senate, at least so far. Romney found further evidence in the Democrats' inability to flip GOP-controlled statehouses.

Romney, however, is mistaken in his basic assertion. First of all, Biden won by more than 5 million popular votes, nearly 4 percent more than Trump's total. The president-elect obtained the highest number of popular votes in the nation's history. Biden's margin of victory, contrary to Romney's claim, is not a mandate for conservatism. Rather, at the very least, the election was a referendum on President Trump's leadership, which of course Trump used to promote conservative ideas concerning tax cuts for the wealthy and the relaxation of business and environmental regulations.

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2020 Election

Expert breaks down the ultimate goal of Trump’s ‘classic Russian-style disinformation campaign’

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Jonathan Rauch, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, spoke with CNN's Brian Stelter on Sunday to explain the ultimate goal of President Donald Trump's false accusations of a rigged and stolen election.

Rauch was asked by Stelter if the issue is Trump is simply trapped in the delusion that he actually beat President-elect Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

"Is delusion a fair word for these election lies?" Stelter wondered.

"No, actually, I don't think it is," Rauch replied. "It's hard to know what's going on in the mind of the president, but you don't really need to. What you need to know is that what he is running right now is a classic Russian-style disinformation campaign of a type known as the firehose of falsehood. That's when you utilize every channel, not just media, but also the bully pulpit, even litigation to push out as many different stories and conspiracy theories and lies and half-truths as you possibly can in order to flood the zone if with disinformation."

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Inside the spread of conspiracies and disinformation by women on social media

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“The QAnon stuff infiltrated Instagram and seeped into the suburban consciousness of American women to a certain extent, and they bought into it,” according to experts.

Originally published by The 19th

Since the internet’s advent, conspiracy theories have acquired followings online. Now, in the era of social media, people use platforms like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to spread disinformation and misinformation. Instagram, the Facebook-owned image platform where influencers tout luxury, beauty and consumer culture, has also become an online home for conspiracies. And lately, one has been particularly prolific: QAnon.

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