President Donald Trump prefers to spend his evenings in bed by 6:30 p.m. to eat a cheeseburger, watch TV and make phone calls, according to a bombshell new book.


Michael Wolff spoke to numerous sources involved in President Donald Trump’s campaign and the first year of his administration, and they describe a surprised and unprepared president struggling to make sense of his new life, according to excerpts published in New York magazine.

The president often dined with chief strategist Steve Bannon, who served a source for Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, but Wolff reported that Trump preferred to get into bed early and spend the evening gossiping with friends over the phone as he watched three television screens.

"As details of Trump’s personal life leaked out, he became obsessed with identifying the leaker," Wolff reported. "The source of all the gossip, however, may well have been Trump himself. In his calls throughout the day and at night from his bed, he often spoke to people who had no reason to keep his confidences. He was a river of grievances, which recipients of his calls promptly spread to the ever-attentive media."

Wolff recounts one "seething, self-pitying, and unsolicited" phone call Feb. 6 to a casual acquaintance, where the president ranted about media coverage and his disloyal staff.

Trump first attacked New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman, whom he called “a nut job," and then slurred Times columnist Gail Collins as a "moron."

Next up was CNN chief Jeff Zucker, whose professional success Trump believed he was personally responsible for, but the president was furious that his news network had aired an “unbelievably disgusting” report about a dossier detailing his salacious alleged activity with Russian prostitutes.

The opposition research compiled by a former British spy claims Trump hired the prostitutes to perform a "golden shower" on a bed at a Moscow hotel where the Obamas had previously slept.

"Having dispensed with Zucker, the president of the United States went on to speculate on what was involved with a golden shower," Wolff wrote. "And how this was all just part of a media campaign that would never succeed in driving him from the White House. Because they were sore losers and hated him for winning, they spread total lies, 100 percent made-up things, totally untrue, for instance, the cover that week of Time magazine — which, Trump reminded his listener, he had been on more than anyone in ­history — that showed Steve Bannon, a good guy, saying he was the real president."

Trump lashed out at Bannon and son-in-law Jared Kushner, then turned his attention to "Saturday Night Live" - which he complained was too mean and "fake comedy," and said adviser Kellyanne Conway had been keeping a record of the unfair treatment.

The rambling, out-of-the-blue call from the president of the United States to a casual acquaintance, who's never identified in the article, lasted for 26 minutes, according to Wolff.