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Dozens of new charges against Manafort confirms Mueller convened at least two grand juries for Trump-Russia probe

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Special counsel Robert Mueller on Thursday issued 32 superseding indictments for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his deputy Rick Gates — and did so using a separate grand jury in a separate venue than the first 12 indictments he issued last year.

The first 12 indictments against Manafort and Gates, all related to bank fraud and conspiracy charges, were issued in the District of Columbia. The 32 new charges, which will replace the original 12, were issued in the Eastern District of Virginia, where Manafort files his taxes. Because the districts are different, this new report confirms speculation that Mueller has convened at least two grand juries in his investigation.

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According to CNN justice correspondent Evan Perez, Manafort “refused to waive venue,” meaning he refused to allow the charges to be brought in D.C.

CNN justice reporter Shimon Prokupecz also said these new indictments suggest Gate’s reported plea deal negotiations are off. Earlier in the day, Gates fired the attorney who was reportedly handling his plea deal as well, and shortly after the Virginia indictments came down, Reuters reported that Manafort’s attempts to modify his bail terms had been rejected by a judge.

Watch the CNN panel discussion on the latest indictments below:

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Ukrainians may flip on Trump and stop repeating his talking points: report

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Officials in Ukraine are growing increasingly frustrated with President Donald Trump continuing to prioritize Russia over the American ally, The Daily Beast reported Wednesday.

"People working closely with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky have been in contact with Trump administration officials over the past several weeks discussing the relationship between the two presidents, according to four people with knowledge of the talks. Based on those conversations, Ukrainian officials came to expect that Trump would make a statement of support before Zelensky met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in France for peace talks," The Beast explained. "But as Saturday and Sunday ticked by, there was only silence from the White House. Even as Ukrainian officials have publicly been loath to criticize Trump’s pressure campaign on their country, frustrations with Washington have quietly percolated. And last weekend, they were especially acute."

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Kamala Harris uses IG hearing to connect the dots between Bill Barr and Giuliani’s corrupt schemes

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Sen. Kamala Harris connected the dots between Rudy Giuliani and attempts to prevent the Department of Justice from prosecuting a Ukrainian billionaire.

Harris, who was San Francisco District Attorney and California Attorney General prior to joining the U.S. Senate, put her experience as a career prosecutor to use while questioning DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

"So it was recently reported that the president's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, asked Ukrainians to help search for dirt [on] the political rivals of the president. In exchange for the help, Giuliani offered to help fix criminal cases against them at DOJ," Harris noted.

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Trump admits defeat in effort to entirely eliminate federal agency with 5,500 employees: report

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President Donald Trump has given up on fulfilling another one of his campaign vows as he runs for re-election on a platform of "promises made, promises kept."

"President Trump has abandoned his administration’s faltering effort to dissolve a key federal agency, a major setback in his three-year battle to keep his campaign promise to make government leaner and more efficient," The Washington Post reported Wednesday. "The Office of Personnel Management will remain the human resources manager of the civilian workforce of 2.1 million employees and its functions will not — for the foreseeable future at least — be parceled out to the White House and the General Services Administration."

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