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Trump ‘would love’ to ‘execute all drug dealers here in America’: report

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Donald Trump has some things in common with President Rodrigo Duterte, the blustery strongman president of the Philippines who has overseen the extrajudicial slaughter of thousands of his people.

According to a new report, Trump is interested in going Full Duterte, with a law that would make selling drugs punishable by death.

“According to five sources who’ve spoken with Trump about the subject, he often leaps into a passionate speech about how drug dealers are as bad as serial killers and should all get the death penalty,” Axios reports. “Trump tells confidants a softer approach to drug reform—the kind where you show sympathy to the offenders and give them more lenient sentences—will never work.”

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The report says that Trump “has said he would love to have a law to execute all drug dealers here in America, though he’s privately admitted it would probably be impossible to get a law this harsh passed under the American system.”

It’s already theoretically possible. Currently, 20 states have laws which which allow drug dealers to be charged with first-degree murder in the event of a a fatal overdose on their product. Some of those states also have the death penalty.

A study on the subject of charges for overdose deaths by the Drug Police Alliance found that such laws were counterproductive as they typically ensnared friends or family instead of dealers and that such laws tended to make users less likely to report overdoses so that the victims could be saved.

“Elected officials unfamiliar with, or resistant to, harm reduction, prevention, and treatment interventions are introducing punitive, counterproductive legislative measures in a misguided effort to reduce overdose fatalities,” the report reads. “Though their rhetoric may be compassionate, their policies are anything but. They are adopting a law and order approach to solve a public health crisis, with devastating consequences.”

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Trump evangelicals abandoned the Sermon on the Mount and replaced it with the ‘Trumpian order’: Historian Jon Meacham

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In an op-ed for the New York Times this Tuesday, historian Jon Meacham discusses the state of Christianity in America during the age of Donald Trump. He points out that Christianity, especially in the hands of Trump-supporting evangelicals, has lost its moral authority in the eyes of many Americans. Understandable, since the hero of millions of Christians "has used the National Prayer Breakfast to mock the New Testament injunction to love one’s enemies."

But according to Meacham, "history suggests that religiously inspired activism may hold the best hope for those in resistance to the prevailing Trumpian order."

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Devin Nunes’ income called into question as watchdog asks for investigation of his finances

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According to a report from the Fresno Bee,the non-partisan Campaign Legal Center is requesting a federal investigation into whether U.S. Representative Devin Nunes (R-CA) is receiving legal services in violation of House ethics rules.

Over the past year, the conservative Republicans has launched a handful of lawsuits against critics -- including the McClatchy newspaper chain and a person on Twitter purporting to be one of his cows.

According to the Bee, "The complaint says Nunes appears to be in 'blatant violation of House rules,' because he would have trouble paying for all these lawsuits solely from his congressional salary of $174,000 per year. The group argues he’d only be able to pay if he received legal services for free, at a discounted rate, or based on a contingency fee, meaning the lawyer would get compensated from Nunes’ winnings if he prevails in his lawsuits."

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2020 Election

$1,750+ ticket prices for South Carolina debate spark outrage

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"I think it speaks to the fundamental, endemic corruption of the Democratic Party establishment that you had to pay... multiple thousands of dollars to get into that room."

Unusually loud booing and jeering directed disproportionately at Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren during Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate—particularly when the senators criticized billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg—sparked probing questions about the class composition of the audience packed inside the Gaillard Center in Charleston, South Carolina.

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