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2-year-old girl dies after parents treat her pneumonia with prayers and anointing oil instead of medicine

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Grace Anne Foster and Jonathan Foster

A jury has been seated in the trial of a Pennsylvania couple whose 2-year-old daughter died after they tried to treat her pneumonia with prayer and religious oils.

Jonathan and Grace Anne Foster have been charged with involuntary manslaughter and endangering the welfare of a child in the Nov. 8, 2016, death of Ella Grace Foster, reported the Reading Eagle.

The couple did not seek medical care for the sick child due to their religious beliefs, and instead asked Pastor Rowland Foster — the girl’s grandfather — to pray over her and anoint her with oils.

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The toddler had a sore throat and struggled to sleep the night before she died, and she stopped breathing in her father’s arms after her mother called him to their Upper Tulpehocken Township home from work.

A forensic pathologist who performed the autopsy testified in a previous hearing that Ella Grace would have been fighting to breathe and coughing uncontrollably due to pneumonia, and he told the court any reasonable person would have concluded she needed medical care.

Defense attorneys have argued that the child’s illness developed rapidly, and the parents made a judgment call.

The 35-year-old Jonathan Foster and his 33-year-old wife previously gave up custody of their other six children, who are aged 1 to 12, after prosecutors tried to add condition to their bail that would have mandated proper medical care for them.

Authorities said at the time that the children would be kept together and placed with a family that believes in medicine.

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Prosecutors sought charges against the grandfather, who is pastor of Faith Tabernacle Church, for failing to report child abuse, but a judge dismissed the case in December for lack of evidence.

Assistant District Attorney Katie Lehman asked the judge not to allow any singing or humming in front of the jury, after supporters from the couple’s church hummed during previous hearings.

Judge M. Theresa Johnson agreed to instruct courtroom observers not to make any noise from the gallery while the trial was in session.

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Inside the spread of conspiracies and disinformation by women on social media

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“The QAnon stuff infiltrated Instagram and seeped into the suburban consciousness of American women to a certain extent, and they bought into it,” according to experts.

Originally published by The 19th

Since the internet’s advent, conspiracy theories have acquired followings online. Now, in the era of social media, people use platforms like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to spread disinformation and misinformation. Instagram, the Facebook-owned image platform where influencers tout luxury, beauty and consumer culture, has also become an online home for conspiracies. And lately, one has been particularly prolific: QAnon.

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2020 Election

More than one dozen Trump officials violated Hatch Act in month before the election

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Although President Donald Trump has tried to undermine the United States' system of checks and balances, watchdogs in Washington, D.C. have been keeping a close eye on him — and according to the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, 16 members of the Trump Administration committed violations of the Hatch Act in order to promote his reelection campaign in October.

In an article published on CREW's website on Monday, November 2 — the day before the 2020 presidential election — CREW reporters Donald K. Sherman and Linnaea Honl-Stuenkel explain, "during the month of October, at least 16 Trump Administration officials have violated the Hatch Act a total of more than 60 times, in an unprecedented and escalating assault on the rule of law and the democratic process. President Trump has allowed — and encouraged — senior officials to use their government roles to take actions benefiting his reelection effort in its final weeks and days as Americans are casting their ballots."

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2020 Election

GOP congressman gets #StopTheStupid trending big-time against Donald Trump — but there’s a catch

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The hashtag #stopthestupid was trending last night on Twitter thanks to -- of all people -- a conservative Republican congressman from Michigan named Paul Mitchell. But before anyone gets too excited that Republicans are discovering integrity, there’s an asterisk: Mitchell is retiring in January.

Here’s what the exasperated congressman tweeted Sunday night in response to Trump’s lunatic ranting about the election outcome:

https://twitter.com/RepPaulMitchell/status/1333214085341712388?s=20

Sunday night, there were more than 21,000 tweets featuring #stopthestupid, many of them wondering aloud why more Republicans cannot show the spine and integrity displayed by Mitchell. Most presumably don’t realize, however, that he’s leaving Congress after just two terms in office.

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