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Ivanka still getting at least $1.5 million from Trump Organization while serving in White House

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Ivanka Trump will get at least $1.5 million a year from the family business even as she serves in the White House under her father’s administration.

President Donald Trump’s eldest daughter is entangled in countless potential conflicts of interest that violate federal law and ethics standards while serving as a special assistant to the president, reported McClatchy.

Both she and her father have been accused of violating the U.S. Constitution’s emoluments clause by accepting gifts from foreign governments without the approval of Congress.

Ivanka Trump is believed to still have only an interim security clearance due to the complex finances of her husband, Jared Kushner, who also serves in the White House.

She was expected to receive $1.5 million each year from three companies affiliated with the Trump Organization, and she will get even more from other Trump Organization businesses.

Those companies are involved in at least five projects that have drawn scrutiny, including a residential development in Dubai, a road project in Bali, a tourist destination in Indonesia, luxury housing projects in India and the Trump International Hotel Washington D.C.

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Those developments involve a Chinese construction company, the Saudi Arabian and South Korean governments, local governments and individual foreign officials.

Ivanka Trump resigned from various vice president positions within Trump Organization after her father’s inauguration, but her financial disclosure forms show she planned to receive money from its businesses.

“When Ms. Trump became a federal employee, she transitioned from being an active investor and manager to being merely a passive investor,” said Peter Mirijanian, a spokesman for the Kushner and Ivanka Trump’s attorney. “She did this as a result of ethics advice she received, and has followed that advice.”

Federal employees applying for a security clearance are not required to sell overseas investments, but they can be forced to divest larger stakes and resign from corporate positions.

Security clearances can be denied for officials who have “substantial” overseas business interests to avoid “a heightened risk of foreign influence or exploitation.”

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Don Trump Jr shamed for sucking up to his dad on Twitter: ‘Ivanka is still his favorite’

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President Donald Trump retweeted about a half dozen posts early Wednesday from his wife and children, but not one particularly approval-seeking tweet from his namesake son.

The president's namesake son hyped his father's promotion of the "American Dream" late Tuesday, but Trump didn't include that one among several others posted by Ivanka Trump, Eric Trump and Melania Trump, as well as another touting son-in-law Jared Kushner's Middle East peace plan.

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In October 2018, The New York Times published a landmark story on how President Donald Trump and his siblings committed large-scale tax fraud in the 1990s to maximize their inheritance.

Even for a story about Trump, who is seemingly invulnerable to financial scandal, it was hugely consequential — among other things, it led to Trump's sister resigning as a federal judge — and the reporters won a Pulitzer Prize for their efforts.

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2020 Election

Joe Biden’s ‘Jim Crow moment’ was dreadful — but he may be Democrats’ best shot at beating Trump

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